Black Education / Schools : AFROCENTRIC HOMESCHOOLERS DOT NET...

Discussion in 'Black Education / Schools' started by Isaiah, Sep 7, 2004.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    3,210
    Likes Received:
    62
    Ratings:
    +62
    http://www.aahnet.org/

    Very interesting resource for African parents wanting and needing some support in schooling thier children from home... Wish such a resource was around for me back in the OLD days...(smile!)

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. CarrieMonet

    CarrieMonet Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2003
    Messages:
    1,244
    Likes Received:
    14
    Occupation:
    Love my job!
    Location:
    Seattle
    Ratings:
    +15
    Interesting...this would have been good to have 12 years ago.
     
  3. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    69,983
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    BUSINESS owner
    Location:
    Da~WINDY*CITY //CHICAGO
    Ratings:
    +4,177
    indeed wish this was out their for me growing up !
    how can this help now in a great way to better our children ?
    and where do we get the right support to make this work?
     
  4. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    3,210
    Likes Received:
    62
    Ratings:
    +62
    Actually, homeschooling might provide us a way to get our young Black Boys past the 3rd grade difficulties they encounter with public school teachers... Jawaazaa Kunjufu says that is when the problems start for young African males, in about the 3rd grade, or 8 years of age... Has anyone read that book, The Conspiracy to Destroy Black Boys???

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  5. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2003
    Messages:
    9,146
    Likes Received:
    1,097
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +1,102
    I"ve been wanting to homeschool my children for the longest time. My insecurities have me on a stand still. I keep thinking, am I knowlegible enough! what if I fail them by not giving them the right information for the test. How will home schooling affect my need to work.

    Their are so many concerns! Also, How do I put in the proper request? Are there any special requirements that I need to have before hand? I know its different for each State. Last but not least, I also need a swift kick in the butt to get me moving. *sigh* I'm so afraid that my son is going to fall by the wayside. Being a single mother without a male role model for my son plays a major factor in his life.

    I know how to be his mother but there are so many things a male role model can provide for him that i'm sure I don't provide him with.

    Oh well! I just have to continue to do the best I know how!
     
  6. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes Received:
    21
    Ratings:
    +21
    Black families integral in home-schooling movement

    Parents seek to teach children more history

    By Leslie Fulbright, San Francisco Chronicle
    November 5, 2006

    Benjamin and Tanya Marshall are part of a new home-schooling movement led by black families fed up with the public school system.

    Nine years ago, the Suisun City couple put their oldest son, Trevaughn, in kindergarten after discussing teaching him at home. When he had a substitute teacher several times in his first six weeks, they pulled him out.

    "We felt like it wasn't the right environment, especially for an African-American boy," said Tanya Marshall, 36.

    "The teachers were young and nervous. Black males were not being challenged and ending up in special ed."

    Trevaughn, now 14, has been taught at home ever since. The couple also home-schools their two younger sons, 11 and 9, and their daughter, 12.

    "We wanted to be the main and driving influence in our children's lives," said Benjamin Marshall, 37.

    The Marshalls, who both had worked as teachers' aides, feared that public school would contradict their Christian beliefs, and they wanted to avoid having their sons labeled as violent or hyperactive or seeing them pressured by peers to drink, do drugs and have sex.

    A desire for more rigorous academics and greater emphasis on black history also has led black families into home schooling, educators say.

    Although home-schoolers often are stereotyped as white and evangelical Christians, in 2003, about 9 percent of home-schooled students were black, and 77 percent were white, compared with a total student population nationwide that was 16 percent black and 62 percent white.

    Home-schoolers numbered 1.1 million in 2003, compared with about 49.5 million students in public and private schools, according to the most recent federal statistics from the U.S. Department of Education.

    The numbers of black and white home-schoolers rose about a third from 1999 to 2003 to encompass about 1.3 percent of U.S. black students and 2.7 percent of whites.

    Researchers say the number of black parents who are home schooling their children may now be growing even faster.

    More than half the students who are home-schooled come from families with three or more children, and more than one-quarter from families making less than $25,000 in 2003, when the nation's median family income was $56,500.

    More than half of home-schooled students came from families making between $25,000 and $75,000.


    Among black, white and Latino students, Latinos are least likely to be home-schooled, at less than 1 percent in 2003; no other ethnic groups are measured.

    The growth among blacks can be seen in the increasing number of networking groups, blogs and Internet sites directed at black home-schoolers -- and in who is showing up at conventions.

    "There was a time when the conferences were all white," said Brian Ray, president of the National Home Education Research Institute in Salem, Ore. "In the '90s, you saw a little more color, and by 2000, a substantial number of black families started showing up.

    "In some cities, the majority of those attending conferences are African-American."

    Many say they left public schools because their children weren't expected to learn at an equal pace or being coached on getting into college, the schools were unsafe, or the curriculum lacked black history.

    "Over the last couple of years, especially in places like D.C. and Cincinnati, there have been a growing number of black home-schooled students," said Michael Apple, a professor at the University of Wisconsin who studies the issue.

    "You will find more in areas where the black middle class can afford to do it."

    Public schools have been a focus of the civil-rights struggle, but many home-schooling parents said they are disillusioned with the system's failure to improve.

    ...

    SOUNDS GREAT but HOMESCHOOLING JUST REVEAL A MAJOR FACTOR:

    It has a CLASS STATUS and a simultaneous extent MARRIAGE STATUS.

    A GREAT DEAL of OUR HISTORY dealt with BOTTOM of CLASS HEIRARCHY MORALLY UPRIGHT when it was TIME to SHINE PEOPLE in our COMMUNITY.

    I dont know how this HISTORY can be USED and TRANSLATED into the MIND of MIDDLE CLASS AMERICA with its DISGUST of POOR EVERYDAY PEOPLE.

    Maybe using HISTORY in this emphasis SHOULD NOT BE USED but some OTHER SKILL be better UTILIZED.

    But AT LEAST even MIDDLE CLASS BLACK PARENTS realize that their BOYS are in TROUBLE too and are ENSURING their PREPARATION for the WORLD to COME.

    Because CURRENTLY it seems the attention on YOUNG BLACK MALES from GRETAER SOCIETY seems like a JOKE.

    Our POOR CITIZENS are left to CHANCE UNFORTUNATELY.
     
Loading...