Pan Africanism : Afro-Latinos and Pan Africanism

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Sun Ship, Feb 5, 2004.

  1. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I believe no one has a patent on what it is to be African, African American or African Latino. As no one has a copyright on what it is to be Black.

    There is a collective cultural paradigm that is intrinsic and intelligently identifiable through scholarship, anthropology and historical sociology of an undeniable diasporic African people in exile. This has been historically, and is currently recognized through, theoretical ethnomusicology, the intrinsic practice of African spiritualism, ethnobotany, culinary similarities and even on an idiosyncratic cultural level. Today, these people speak English, Spanish, French, Portuguese and many other patois and Creolized dialects.

    I wouldn’t be surprise that the Afro-Latino’s political, cultural, historical and social awareness is, by it’s own nature, the fastest, largest and most culturally based, modern Pan African movement in the western hemisphere.

    They, like us…have a long way to go to remove the mis-education and psychological damage that has deracinated the continuity and extinguished many commonalities of the diasporic community, of African descent.

    Africans, African Americans and African Latino’s must make this ancestral connection a productive reality, in light of brother Malcolm’s pronouncement, “by any means necessary”

    I welcome Africans and New World Africans/Africanos to post any progressive knowledge that will promote our ancestral and future unity. I think even our Amerindian ancestors would smile on this thread. :)

    Please feel free to post the name of musical artist, visual artist, cultural facts and collaborations, factual information and opinions. Etc., etc., etc.

    Peace, love and ashe!

    Sun Ship
     
  2. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Africans of the Americas meet in Chile

    Here is something powerful.



    Preparatory Conference of the Americas Against Racism Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance

    Declaration of African Descendants


    December 5-7, 2000
    Santiago, Chile


    Preamble



    Affirming that the main victims of racism in the Americas are African descendants and indigenous peoples.

    Recognizing the contributions of Africans and their descendants to the creation of the wealth, cultures and societies of the Americas.

    Affirming that slavery constitutes a crime against humanity which imposes on states and multilateral organizations the moral and ethical obligation to make reparations.

    Noting that African descendants in the Americas are the victims of multiple forms of discrimination including institutional, systemic and structural practices, some of which are perpetrated by states themselves;

    Deploring the global imbalances in power and wealth, created by 500 years of genocide, slavery, colonialism, and other gross forms of exploitation, which gravely impede the development of African descendants;

    Acknowledging the fundamental role of women of African descent in the development of our peoples and communities, even though historically they have faced the worst conditions, greatest marginalization and systematic exclusion;

    Denouncing state practices that deny the existence of racism and its consequences for African descendants;

    Recognizing that participatory democracy constitutes the fundamental premise for combating racism and guaranteeing the human, economic, cultural and social rights of African descendants;

    Recognizing that racism is a major determinant of health that has a devastating impact on African decendants including but not limited to the HIV/AIDS and mental health.




    African descendants gathered in Santiago make the following:

    Declaration



    We affirm that African descendants have the right to our cultural identities, to recognition of those identities and to the adoption of measures that protect and develop them, as well as educational systems and institutions that respect our history, cultures, and identities.

    We condenm the situation of exclusion and marginalization that leaves our peoples submerged in poverty in all the Americas, a situation aggravated by the implementation of economic policies and development models that do not respect diversity, promote homogeneity, and perpetuate the systematic violation of our economic, political, social and cultural rights. As a consquence, we demand that states, multilateral organizations and private enterprise adopt compensatory measures, including reparations.

    We consider that racism and racial discrimination manifest themselves in different and profound ways against women of African descent and worsen their precarious living conditions and systematic exclusion in the political, social, economic and cultural spheres, with nefarious consequences on the new generations of African descendants.

    We reiterate that the youth, migrants and internally displaced peoples of African descent are submitted to conditions of multiple discrimination, which limit their full access to education, housing, employment, health and education services, and to the full enjoyment of human development.

    We manifest our concern about new forms of racism and racial discrimination like environmental racism, which make areas of settlement and territories inhabited by peoples of African descent places of transit and deposit of toxic products and nuclear waste and of installation of businesses that lack minimum environmental standards.

    We call attention also to the problem of access to the new communication technologies and their utilization for the diffusion of racist and xenophobic messages.

    We also denounce inadequate access to preventive and curative health services, which severely affects our communites, especially people with HIV/AIDS.

    We affirm the right of our peoples to ancestrally occupied land and territories and natural resources, to their management, control and use, and to their protection by adequate mechanisms of traditional know-how and practices. We observe with concern that systematic pressure is applied by violent, legal, and administrative methods on these territories, lands and natural resources, which generates forced internal displacements, migrations, impoverishment of ecosystems and higher levels of poverty, exclusion, and marginality. We highlight with concern the negative impacts on our lands, territories, and natural resources, and on our life and culture, of the implementation of mega projects and the absence of adequate consulting mechanisms.

    We note that peoples of African descent are victims of grave discriminatory treatment in legal and judicial processes, as well as police procedures. We denounce the inhuman situation of prisons, which affects in particular African descendants. We repudiate the application of the death penalty.

    We affirm that African descendants people have the irrevocable right to cultural, self-determination and political autonomy and to conduct our destinies, to participate on equal terms and by means of adequate mechanisms in the decisions that affect us and in all decisions of our societies.

    We observe with concern the absence of adequate social and political representation in all the spheres of our societies lives. We express the need to strengthen our peoples areas of activity and forms of organization as an indispensable condition to the strengthening of democracy and the fight against racism.

    We recognize the right of peoples to self-determination, for which reason we condemn colonialism, which subjugates the inalienable rights of sister nations and peoples in the Americas.

    We demand respect for our fundamental right to development consistent with our worldview, and we emphasize the general inexistence of policies and specific pertinent measures in the area of development and the inefficacy of those adopted by states to overcome poverty, exclusion, and marginality.


    RECOMMENDATIONS



    That the nation states that participated in the Trans-Atlantic slave trade and in the system of enslavement of Africans must begin serious and profound discussions with African descendants directed to identifying and implementing appropriate compensatory remedies, including reparations.

    That the Decade of African Peoples of African Descent be declared as from the year 2002.

    That the Office of the High Commissioner authorizes a representative of the peoples of African descent to address the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Forms of Intolerance in South Africa.

    That a special fund be established for the institutional strengthening and promotion of development of African communities.

    That multilateral, financial, development, and human rights organizations formulate diagnostic indicators of the effectiveness of their policies and programs directed to the strengthening of African communities.

    We call on states to adopt urgent legisltation and other measures of recognition, demarcation and protection of rights to land, territories and natural resources, to the promotion of full development of the communities that live in them and the restitution of environmentally damaged lands and territories.

    We call on states to establish, in cooperation with peoples of African descendants, political and administrative measures to combat racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and other related forms of intolerance and to assign adequate and appropriate resources for their implementation.

    That in all public policies and in the Plan of Action that comes out of this Conference the gender perspective be systematically incorporated.

    We demand the immediate cessation of the military occupation of African descendant communities in the Americas.

    Ashe,

    Sun Ship


    P.S. - I hope this came out right.
     
  3. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Afro-Uruguayan

    This is from 1999

    UN Press Release
    20.08.99


    COMMITTEE ON ELIMINATION OF RACIAL DISCRIMINATION
    ADOPTS CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS ON REPORTS OF CHILE, URUGUAY


    Requests Chile to Consider Apology for Past Discrimination Against Indigenous Peoples; Expresses Concern About Situation of Afro-Uruguayan and Indigenous Communities

    The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination this morning adopted concluding observations on the reports of Chile and Uruguay by commending the Government of Chile for having recognized its part in the discrimination experienced by the indigenous populations and requesting it to consider a formal apology and compensation.

    In its concluding observations on Uruguay, the Committee, among other things, particularly expressed concern about the situation of women in the Afro-Uruguayan community, who were victims of double discrimination on grounds of both gender and race.

    When the Committee reconvenes at 3 p.m., it will continue its adoption of the concluding observations of Mauritania, which it started before the end of its morning meeting.

    Concluding Observations on Report of Chile

    The Committee appreciated and commended the Government of Chile for openly recognizing the existence of racial discrimination on its territory and its historical links with conquest and colonialism. It welcomed the initiatives taken by the State party in order to ensure the rights of its indigenous population. The Committee noted with interest that further steps had been taken towards reform of the domestic legislation, in particular the proposed amendments to the Constitution to strengthen the legal status of the indigenous population.

    Concern was expressed about research showing that a considerable part of the Chilean population demonstrated intolerant and racist tendencies. The Committee also expressed its concern at the absence of specific legislation to enforce some of the provisions of the Convention. It took note that the 1993 Indigenous Act contained a specific article declaring intentional discrimination against indigenous persons, an offence punishable by law. The Committee was further concerned about land disputes between the Mapuche population and national and multinational private companies, which resulted in tension, violence, clashes with law enforcement officials and allegedly led to arbitrary arrests of members of the indigenous population.

    Among its suggestions and recommendations, the Committee commended Chile for having recognized its part in the discrimination experienced by the indigenous and requested the State party that it consider the issue of a formal apology, as well as ways to ensure compensation to all concerned, which would significantly contribute in the reconciliation process in the society as a whole. In addition, the Committee recommended that the Chilean Constitution be amended to incorporate a prohibition of racial discrimination; that measures be taken to bring its legislation in to full conformity with article 4 of the Convention; and that Chile use all effective means to raise the awareness of its people about the rights of indigenous peoples and national or ethnic minorities.

    Concluding Observations on Report of Uruguay

    In its concluding observations on the report of Uruguay, the Committee welcomed the constitutional status granted to protection of human rights and the recognition of the principle of equality of individuals designed to preclude any form of discrimination, including racial discrimination. It also welcomed the inclusion of information on the demographic composition of Chile, in line with the Committee's previous recommendation.

    Among the Committee's concerns was that information on the situation of ethnic groups living in the State party's territory remained insufficient. Concern was also expressed about the lack of information on special measures, such as an affirmative action programme, taken for the protection of the rights of disadvantaged ethnic groups such as Afro-Uruguayans and indigenous groups. The Committee was also concerned about the effective access to protection and remedies against acts of racial discrimination against, in particular, the Afro-Uruguayan and indigenous communities. The Committee expressed concern about the situation of women belonging to the Afro-Uruguayan community, who were victims of double discrimination on grounds of both their gender and race. It further expressed concern about the absence of sufficient information on the teaching of human rights, in particular on the combatting of racial discrimination, in the school curricula.

    The Committee recommended, among other things, that Uruguay include in its next report information on the political, economic and social situations of ethnic groups living in the country. Uruguay was recommended that it establish special programmes aimed at facilitating the social enhancement of the Afro-Uruguayan community, which suffered double discrimination on grounds of both their gender and race. The Committee recommended that the State party take immediate and appropriate measures to ensure the enjoyment of all the rights enumerated in article 5 of the Convention in particular by members of the Afro-Uruguayan and indigenous communities.


    Peace,

    Sun Ship
     
  4. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Wow!

    Brother Sun Ship :bowdown: this was so powerful that I had to stop and catch my breath because it filled me with such emotion when I read it! Even though you know how bad racism is, how painful it has been and continues to be, when I read this, so articulately and eloquently stating racism's impact on our people, it evoked great "shock and awe" in me still.

    I was going to ask whatever happened as a result of this declaration and who oversees that it continues to be pushed forward but I noticed that you had responded before I had a chance to ask.

    But, I'm wondering whether any such "declaration" exists in the United States, composed by African Americans? Wouldn't you think there would be somewhere that included similar language and if not, why not?

    If there isn't, I could see where we and others could use the Chilean document as a prototype to follow. Those of us that support such a powerful declaration, could form an alliance that could send a shock wave around the world don't you think? This is a very bold and aggressive move and I'm wondering, who among us would be strongly opposed to such a movement?

    I don't know that much about Jewish reparations post-Holocaust, but I would like for someone to explain to me exactly how it came about that people who participated in persecuting the Jews were able to be tried in a court (what type of court?) and prosecuted for their crimes? Also, how and who pays reparations to Jewish victims of the holocaust and does this include their descendents?

    Maybe I should post my questions in another thread so as not to disrupt the flow and purpose of this thread?

    Peace :spinstar:
     
  5. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    One people, one voice, one nation

    In a Pan African political worldview, their declarations should be our declarations. I think we should support their efforts and have a joint response. Even though many African American activist, revolutionary thinkers and intellectuals have written guidelines and declarations before, I think we do need something that is all encompassing.

    The Kawaida theory that invoked Kwanzaa lays down a liberation philosophy. But I still think we need a modern Pan African declaration that could be embraced by both Africans Americans and African-Latinos.
     
  6. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Afro-Argentinean

    More things to be considered.

    "Argentina and Uruguay are known for the music and dance tango, which is an outgrowth of other older African-based dances and musical forms of milonga, candombe and canyengue, and habanera, a rhythm from Cuba. It is interesting to note that the most prolific writer of milongas was the Afro-Argentinean, Gabino Ezeiza (1858-1916), with more than 500 compositions to his credit. In Kikongo the term related to tango is tanga, meaning “feast, festival, banquet” which is exactly how the word ‘tango’ was used in Afro-Argentine newspapers. In the early 1800’s both Buenos Aires and Montevideo had weekly dances or parties referred to as “tangos de los negros” (tangos of the blacks.) Another associated term is tangana , which means “to go, to walk like a chameleon” with the idiomatic sense of “to walk that walk or to strut.” Although there were numerous earlier tangos, the first tango with a known author was El Entrerriano (The Person from Entre Ríos), written in 1896 by Rosendo Mendizábal, an Afro-Argentine accordionist. Despite the abundant musical and etymological evidence in Argentina and Uruguay, the African cultural contribution is obscured through racism and poorly constructed history."
     
  7. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Afro-Bolivians

    Another Afro-"snippet" :)

    Afro-Bolivian Traditions
    of the Yungas Region


    The African tradition has had an especially powerful impact on many modern forms of dance and music. Afro-Bolivian identity still finds its main matrix in the traditional cults of African origin. The most prominent is the Saya of the subtropical Yungas region east of La Paz. During the slavery period, the Spaniards had in fact banned the African religions among the blacks they imported. However they tolerated the all-night sessions of drumming, singing and dancing that often took place in the slave barracks, for they never quite understood that the dancing and the worship were in fact indivisible.

    After the independence in 1825, all of the slaves moved to the Yungas, the village settlements, where they sustained a living on their own in the subtropical region with a climate similar to that of their native Africa. This is where some of the most interesting Afro-Bolivian Festivals are scheduled each year.
     
  8. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  9. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Chano Pozo

    Luciano "Chano" Pozo Gonzalez

    Percussionist


    Born 1/7/1915, killed in a bar room fight in Harlem 12/2/48. Played with Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Chico O'Farrill, Carlos "Patato" Valdes, Miguelito Valdez, and many others as well.

    He got his start after moving to New York in 1947 when Mario Bauza got him to play with Dizzy Gillespie, an event that changed the course of American Jazz. Chano Pozo thereby played a major role in the founding of Latin-jazz which was essentially a mixture of bebop and Cuban folk music. He gained his musical background from AfroCuban religions. Among his features with Dizzy were "Cubana Be," "Cubana Bop," "Tin Tin Deo" and "Manteca" which was later a big hit with Eddie Palmieri and Cal Tjader. Pozo co-wrote "Tin Tin Deo" and "Manteca"

    Unfortunately Chano Pozo had a hot temper and he was killed in a Harlem bar a month shy of his 34th birthday
     
  10. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    warrior sister fights

    Alumna calls on BU [Binghamton University ] Latinos to fight 'negrophobia' myth


    By Carly Lipkowitz
    Staff Writer

    Even though blacks and mulattos make up 90 percent of today's current population in the Dominican Republic, there is a widespread fear of "negrophobia" held among the people there, Griselda Rodriguez, an alumna of Binghamton University said Thursday in a lecture titled "Afro-Dominicanness: Erasure or Embracement?"

    "I was very ignorant to racial issues when I came to Binghamton," Rodriguez said. But through her professors and her friends, she developed a black identity.

    Juanita Diaz, a sociology professor who attended the lecture, understands why Rodriguez feels this way.

    "Our concept of what it means to be black in the U.S. is an African-American concept," she said.

    Rodriguez, a first-year master's student at Syracuse University with a concentration in African-American and Latino-American Studies, outlined the history of blacks in the Dominican Republic, saying that racism has a long stronghold in the nation.

    "This negrophobia is so engrained into our mentality," said Rodriguez of Dominicans.

    Rodriguez said the roots of negrophobia among the Dominican people originated in July 1502 under Don Nicolas de Ovando, a Spanish governor of Hispanola. He forced the natives of the island to work. She said that afterward, negative characteristics such as laziness, dishonesty, and intellectual inferiority were attributed to blacks in the Dominican Republic.

    The situation was made worse when Rafael Leonida Trujillo sent his men to massacre Haitians and black Dominicans in 1937, imposing white supremacy over the land, Rodriguez said.

    Rodriguez said global powers use people of color, particularly women, as a source of cheap labor because they are so desperate for jobs.

    The International Monetary Fund, an organization intended to aid countries in need, imposes the values of dominant countries like the United States and European nations, Rodriguez said.

    "Liposuction is rampant in the Dominican Republic because thin and white is in," Rodriguez said, describing the Dominican Republic as being "white-washed."

    Rodriguez also discussed what is "black" about the Dominican Republic. Items in her list included the language, which she described as being spoken fast and having a "twang"; spiritual expressions such as voodoo; and alternative healing methods, the Merengue, and Banco de Palo.

    Banco de Palo is a performance that honors a person's death. Contrary to the European American belief, when a person dies, it is not a devastating event, for the spirit lives on though the physical body is deceased, Rodriguez said.

    Rodriguez ended her lecture with a call to action for Dominicans to provide a strong notion of racial identity to blacks in the Dominican Republic. But, she said that she realizes that this task may be met with resistance.

    "My passion comes from challenging people that challenge me, that's why I'm interested in this research," she said.

    Mag da Medina, a senior sociology major, said the speech was very educational.

    "I'm Dominican and we are raised to deny our African background when it's contributed so much to our culture. Rodriguez exposed the true but sad facts of blackness in Dominican Republic."
     
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