Black People : Africa's Oil and the usa

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by oldsoul, Oct 4, 2008.

  1. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Africa's Oil and the usa

    The United States consumes 25 percent of the world's petroleum and 22.5 percent of the world's natural gas. The U.S. imports 13.5 million barrels per day (MMBD), which accounts for 63.5 percent of U.S. consumption (20.6 MMBD). Since 1973, U.S. consumption of foreign oil has escalated as a percentage of total consumption. The available data indicate that this trend will continue and that global oil consumption will increase by 76 percent over the next 30 years and natural gas consumption will increase by 153 percent.
    Many Americans do not recognize the importance of Africa, particularly West African oil. Currently, over 18 percent of U.S. crude oil imports comes from Africa, compared to 17 percent from the Persian Gulf. Nigeria accounts for 47 percent of African oil imports, and Algeria and Angola provide 19 percent each. A discussion paper issued by the National Intelligence Council in 2004 predicts that the U.S. will import 25 percent of its oil from Africa by 2015.
    Nigeria is of great strategic importance to the United States. It is the largest oil producer (2.28 MMBD in 2006) in Africa and the 11th largest producer in the world. Only Venezuela, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, and Canada export more oil to the United States.
    The fight over who controls oil revenues underlies many of Nigeria's problems. This is not surprising when one considers how few citizens currently benefit. Although petroleum revenues constitute 90 percent to 95 percent of Nigeria's total budget revenues, only 1 percent of the population receives the money. A small group of foreign oil companies— including Royal Dutch Shell and Chevron U.S.A.— turn over nearly half of their profits to the Nigerian government. As a result, the government does not depend on revenues from the population and therefore does not provide quality services.
    War-torn Sudan has emerged as a major African oil exporter. After completing a major oil-export pipeline that runs from central Sudan to Port Sudan in 1999, Sudan's oil-exporting revenues have grown rapidly with help from consumer countries, especially China. The Oil and Gas Journal estimates that Sudan has 5 billion barrels in reserves, mostly in southern Sudan.
    Chad has a long history of civil war and exhibits many conditions associated with post-conflict zones. Throughout Chad, running water, electricity, paved roads, and health clinics are generally unavailable. Life expectancy is 46 years for men and 48 years for women.
    To overcome its geographic disadvantage of being landlocked, Chad needed a pipeline to make use of its over 1 billion barrels in proven oil reserves. The World Bank and a consortium of oil companies led by ExxonMobil, ChevronTexaco, and Petronas set up a pipeline project in Chad. Construction on the $3.5 billion Chad–Cameroon Petroleum Development and Pipeline Project began in 2000 and was completed in 2004.
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    Africa is also a potential source of ethanol. Africa offers the ideal tropical climate for producing ethanol from sugarcane. Expanding the biofuel industry in Africa promises to create thousands if not millions of jobs for the long term, diversifying away from petroleum-based economies that produce few jobs.
     
  2. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

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    That last sentence is most important. Why build an economy based on fossil fuel in a world that needs desperately to move away from fossil fuels? While jobs are being created one might also ask are the Black governments in Africa gaining in power?
     
  3. Jahari Kavi

    Jahari Kavi Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That's a shame........

    Word. Alternative energy is where it's gonna be at, as far as the future economy and job market is concerned.
     
  4. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

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    A government founded on what will soon become obsolete won't last long but with only 1 per cent of the people benefiting from it anyway it won't make much difference to the majority of Black Nigerians if the government topples. Maybe that will provide an opportunity for them to put up a government that works for them if they prepare to take that opportunity.
     
  5. Jahari Kavi

    Jahari Kavi Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    the question though is.............are they preparing???


    I hope so............
     
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