Pan Africanism : African tribe stays virtually AIDS free

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by dustyelbow, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    African tribe stays virtually AIDS free
    Few infected because women have equality,

    U of T study says
    Aug. 12, 2006. 01:00 AM
    JOSEPH HALL
    STAFF REPORTER

    Along the northern border between Botswana and Namibia, in a region of Africa that is raging with AIDS, a small tribe of some 3,000 souls is living virtually free of HIV infection.

    But the secret of the Ju/'hoansi (pronounced ZHUN-twasi) people is not based on a mysterious immunity, modern medicine, simple isolation or missionary strictures against sex.

    It stems, rather, from an idea derived from the ancient hunter-gatherer lifestyle of their recent past. It's the concept that men and women are equal, says University of Toronto anthropologist Richard Lee, who has studied the tribe since 1963.

    Lee's study on the role gender equality can play in stemming the tide of African AIDS is one of about 4,500 pieces of research that will be presented at the International AIDS Conference in Toronto that starts tomorrow.

    Culled from more than 14,000 international submissions, the chosen research represents one of the most comprehensive collections of knowledge about the disease ever presented.

    And while people familiar with the selected submissions say no "magic bullet" cure or earth-shaking scientific advance is likely to emerge during the five-day gathering, they agree that the biannual conference still represents a crucial armament in the global fight against AIDS.

    Lee's research, to be presented Monday, concludes that the relatively equal rights shared by men and women in Ju/'hoansi society has allowed them to largely escape the scourge of AIDS that is ravaging much of southern Africa.

    A growing and well-accepted body a research over recent years has suggested that women's subservience in many African societies has played a crucial role in the spread of the disease.

    Simply put, many African women are given no choice about their sexual partners, can't reject philandering husbands and have no power to insist that condoms be used, says pioneering Toronto AIDS doctor Philip Berger, who worked with African AIDS patients for seven months last year.

    Lee says the high status of women in the Ju/'hoansi tribe gives them significant autonomy in choosing their sexual and marriage partners.

    "In the other societies around the region, the young men will say, `Oh no, a girl has to obey me if I want to have sex with her, and if I don't want to use a condom, that's it,'" says Lee.

    "With the Ju/'hoansi, their high status in the community gives women plenty of leverage in sexual negotiations."

    Indeed, Lee says, acceptance of a man's sexual advances is usually a prelude to marriage in the tribe. And Ju/'hoansi men would typically have fewer female partners than males in most western societies, he says.

    "The traditional high status of women has worked in their favour in keeping the rates of HIV very low."

    The tribe, which straddles the Namibia-Botswana border, live in a remote area removed from truck routes that have served as conduits for AIDS in Africa.

    Their isolation has no doubt offered a buffer against the disease for the community, where the incidence of HIV infection is likely less than 4 per cent, Lee says. Infection rates in Namibia as a whole are 20 per cent or more.

    But Lee says other equally isolated tribes can exhibit high incidence of AIDS. What sets the "click language" speaking Ju/'hoansi apart is the hunter-gatherer culture they only partially abandoned in recent decades, he says.

    "Before the age of AIDS the Ju/'hoansi were famous in anthropology for being among the last hunting and gathering people in the world," says Lee who has worked extensively on anti-AIDS initiatives in the region.

    And unlike most African cultures, which have long been based on farming or urban existence, hunter-gatherers typically granted women significant respect and status, he says. Even today, Lee says, the Ju/'hoansi practise some hunter-gathering survival strategies, but mix in farming and herding.
    ....

    The rest here

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    This term "equality" is thrown around with much laziness. Women are appreciated and the men see them as part of survival, prosperity, etc. It is essentially become CULTURAL.

    Like how you give your money YOUR TIME, YOUR APPRECIATION, UNDERSTANDING ITS ROLE, this African tribe I like AFRICAN PEOPLES term better does the same apparently for their WOMEN. While your MONEY is DEAD PAPER these WOMEN are ALIVE BEINGS.

    What did they get in RETURN. They have little or no AIDS that PLAGUES the region in which they LIVE.

    But it looks like Ju/'hoansi will be JOINING the rest of the WORLD and will be PLAGUED just like IT.

    Maybe I talk to much FOOLISH things.

    Oh well.
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The Ju/'hoansi Today


    ...The Challenge of HIV/AIDS

    Geographically the Ju/’hoansi are located in the heart of the world region hardest hit by AIDS.

    Despite the known danger, many Namibian men object to the use of condoms as they view the condom as implying unfaithfulness and they become angry if the issue is raised. Hence Namibian women are put in a very difficult position, although they have the eventual say in whether they want to have sexual intercourse with the men.

    The Ju/’hoan’s sense of empowerment and high status relative to men has proven to be a valuable defense in the fight against AIDS. However, some Ju women participate in the drinking culture of shebeens and home-brew establishments catering largely to men from outside the communities, creating points of entry for HIV infection....


    http://sc2218.wetpaint.com/page/12.+The+Ju/'hoansi+Today
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Negotiating the search for diagnosis and
    healing tuberculosis in Namibia. A case study
    of a Ju/’hoansi speaking man.​


    ...In Namibia tuberculosis affects a disproportionate number of Ju/’hoansi speakers who suffer and die from it each year. It is a disease that marks social inequality, lack of power and poor or insufficient nutrition.....



    http://www.codesria.org/IMG/pdf/Negotiating_the_search_for_diagnosis_and.pdf
     
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