Pan Africanism : African Languages

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by rebelafrika, May 1, 2003.

  1. rebelafrika

    rebelafrika Member MEMBER

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    Is anybody learning or studying any African languages? I am learning Swahili. My Swahili teacher told me If I was to learn Swahili, Hausa and Arabic, I would pretty much be able to communicate with people everywhere in Africa. But I think it's a pretty good idea to learn an African language. I first got intrigued with learning an African language when one of my comrades told me about how when he was in prison, that bruthas (at that time) was "making" him learn Swahili and then they would communicate in Swahili and nobody would ever know what they was plotting *smile.*
     
  2. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

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    cool, that sounds great. love, peace and much success.
     
  3. CrunchyStuff

    CrunchyStuff Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I was thinking about the fact that we need "uniformity" in the writing of African languages today.

    We need a new script possible. And this script would be used for all African languages.

    This new script would allow for instance in Ethiopia the letters "BAD" may mean "snake" and in the Congo, they may mean "cut", and in Ghana it may mean "Bite", so while your language is different the writing of it would give just about the same meaning and it would be the same uniform script.

    For instance if the government wrote "write", in Ethiopia it might mean "write" and in South Africa it might mean "sign" and in Liberia it might mean "permanent". These would generally result in the same actions with different words.

    Sorta of incorporating the spoken language into a written form.

    As you said, most languages in Africa while different and unique do have similar meanings associated with similar sounding words.

    I think we need to think about doin away with the Roman script [the one we use for English] and pretty much get a uniform script that takes into account African word usage.

    I do not know. I am not a linguist but I think it could work.
     
  4. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Another good language to learn would be French...as a great number of African countries are French speaking
     
  5. Monetary

    Monetary going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I am not learning any African languages at the moment. But, I would love to learn a few. Kiswahili and Yoruba.
     
  6. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Yoruba would be an interesting language to learn...but it would limit you to Nigeria. French and Swahili would enable you to communicate with more ethnic groups & countries.
     
  7. CrunchyStuff

    CrunchyStuff Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    PanAfrica,

    Good Idea. Another idea is to take Spanish. Some African countries still speak spanish. And you have the added benefit that Spanish and French are very similar. My sister who speaks french can understand my son who speaks spanish. And then another benefit is that you can speak to latin Americans.

    Thus with Spanish, you can communicate with Africans, Europeans and Latin Americans.

    it is also a very very simple language to learn. Since it is a phoenetic language. In other words their vowels only make one sound. If you see the word read in Spanish it always sounds like READ. Not like here where the word Read can sould like READ or RED. Very Easy.
     
  8. rebelafrika

    rebelafrika Member MEMBER

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    What African countries speak spanish? Maybe you mean Portugese like in Mozambique.
     
  9. Monetary

    Monetary going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    panafrica

    I would choose Yoruba because I know of a few people who actually speak the language. :D
     
  10. CrunchyStuff

    CrunchyStuff Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Rebel Afrika,

    Your right. It is Portugese. I am always thinking they speak Spanish down in Brazil where 50 percent of the pop. is African. But it is Portugese. I was thinking of Angola. A large percentage of the slaves brought to south America were from Angola.

    Of course the same still holds true about what I said about Spanish and French, maybe even more true about Spanish and Portugese.

    Anyways, that is a choice between two things european languages.

    I think I am like Monet. I might choose a more African language. I know a few people who speak Yoruba. I actually have the Yoruba language sounds down loaded to my computer.

    Bowini!
     
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