Black People : African Cultural Retentions?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Knowledge Seed, Feb 24, 2014.

  1. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Much debate has been had about the origins and heritage of African Americans.

    Information changes. Disinformation campaigns occur. Anyone can write a book or start a website saying whatever they want about our heritage.

    However, one thing that doesn't change quickly and can't ever be doubted is culture.

    What are some of the African cultural retentions African Americans have maintained over time?

    What ethnic group does the practice originate with?

    Are these traditions regional or are they shared by most African Americans?
     
  2. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Culture, Culture
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    Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Blackbird, Jan 29, 201
    http://destee.com/index.php?threads/culture-culture.79383/



     
  3. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    If we know where to look, we can find many examples of African cultural retentions in our culture.

    If we studied our culture as intently as we studied the cultures of ancients, we would have a much greater understanding of many things.

    I lament the apparent one sidedness of Black folks in the United States. We have even touched the tip of the iceberg in regards to the inherent beauty, marvelous culture and essence of who we are as a people.
     
  4. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Hoodou (or as most day, Hoodoo). That answers the first question. 33.3% is about as much I'm going to say.
     
  5. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I love Hoodoo. My John the Conqueror root is always working. The Congo beauty of Hoodoo is forever in my bloodlines. Then a lil Little John to Chew works wonders. No man should be without his jackball.
     
  6. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Which means getting out of this thinking that we are monolithic, when our communities are more diverse that they are in many communities in Africa. We speak in an African Americanized box and dismiss our own cultural diversity.

    For example, what about foods? Are African Americans the only black folks who eat fried fish as collared greens?

    In fact, when I speak of We, I'm talking about global Afrikans, not ghosts of Mississippi.

    So, our traditions are living, not dead, as long as We are.

    I am no different from my two Ethiopian sisters sitting next to me or the Nigerian sister sitting across from us on the bus.

    Let's keep in mind not all of us nor our ancestors came in chains. Therefore, we encompass all regions, every time period, in the course of human history. Therefore, our traditions are numerous. I am only concerned with how much of that will be retained as many of Us are facing extermination. No people, no culture.
     
  7. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Agreed. Our roots are varied. My origins are atypical of many of my fellow Black folks. I am culturally a Louisiana Creole with strong Amerindian influences. My particular family, who self identifies as Black, eats some things that many AAs have never eaten. I also grew up speaking Louisiana French as a native speaker learned in my household from my elders.
     
  8. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Bro., same here on the maternal side, with a strong Lowcountry, Gullah Geechie influence. It's shown in the cooking. I have tried to retain as much of that as possible. On my paternal side, Black "Indian" from OK but down to Natchitoches as the Bayou and Baton Rouge. As you know them parts are all mixed so this is why I claim no one such cultural or spiritual heritage or tradition. If anything I am Hoodou and that does not require a preacher or a priest. I had family traditions passed to me directly before my parents passed into the ether.
     
  9. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Unfortunately for me, I did not choose to claim anything. I was chosen. I was separated out of the lot because of my obligation, because I have a job to do. It is not a pretty life but what can I say. Since answering the call, my life has been awesomely changed for the better. My ancestors and spirits moved within me. I also am a root worker, yet my Indian and African ancestors have taken me much further to a deeper understanding of my birthright (s). I am a priest not because I wanted to be but because I was meant to be.
     
  10. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    This is why we must learn to respect what between us may amount to different roles. Just as you were chosen to be a priest, I was chosen to be a scribe or griot. Others have similar or different callings. Each with a role that is vital to our communities.
     
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