Black Women : African-Caribbean Slave Women

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by NNQueen, May 23, 2003.

  1. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    "The ability of the black Caribbean slave woman to withstand punishments, maintain cultural identity, resist the master, and to take on various authoritative roles is the essence of true resistance. And the black Caribbean slave woman passed on her power, beauty and strength to her descendants in the form of a legacy of dignity and struggle, one still much needed in the world today."

    Read about our sisters in the struggle who set examples for us to live by today:

    http://www.library.miami.edu/archives/slaves/womens_resistance/womens.html
     
  2. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This great topic belongs over on the PanAfrican thread!! Indeed black female (and male) slaves in the Carribean, were truly inspirational in their struggles against oppression. Jamaica's Nanny (who led Jamaica's Maroon community to freedom from the British in the 1800s) was the ultimate example of black female strength and courage.
     
  3. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Hey Pan, I debated about where to place this and decided here hoping to inspire more people to read and post more frequently at the Pan-African forum. Twisted logic, huh? :)

    In my quest to learn more about Pan-Africanism I was searching for information about women in the movement. I wanted to know whether there were any, who they were (are) and the types of contributions they've made to the struggle for freedom and to end oppression. Not only do I want to learn about women of the past, but also women in the present.

    If you have more information about Jamaica's Nanny, why don't you share it here or at the Pan-African forum. I don't think we read or hear enough positive information about us as a people, but especially as Black women.

    Thanks PA! :)
     
  4. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I'll give you a brief history lesson on Maroons and Nanny. Maroons were runaway slaves that formed small villages in the mountains of various Caribbean islands, Brazil, and Some parts of America (S. Carolina & Virginia). Maroon communities often raided slave plantations (to both free slaves and boost their numbers) and often fought military battles with European slave owners, who constantly tried to recapture and enslave them. Of the many Maroon communities that existed throughout the Americas (North America, South America, and the Caribbean). By far the biggest, and most famous were in Jamaica.

    This particular Maroon community was made up of former Akan slaves and they began a decades long slave revolt against the British beginning in 1760 and ending with the British Emancipation Act of 1833 (which recognized the Maroons as an independent group). At the time of their independance, the Jamaican Maroons were led by a female slave named Nanny. She is a Jamaican heroine, and is a relatively well known historical figure (at least to those who are well versed in black history). From what I hear her picture is even on Jamaican currency.
     
  5. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Thank you PA, very interesting story. Here's a bit more to add to your information.

    http://www.expressionsofsoul.com/id71.html

    I'm wondering whether people can fight against oppression the same way they fought slavery? Are they the same? Is one tangible and the other intangible? Is one physical and the other psychological?
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Can you say "To-may-to"/"To-mah-to?"


    Dr. King said, "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."

    If only more embraced that, what a wonderful world it would be.
     
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