Black Spirituality Religion : African Beginnings and Perspectives on Islam

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by OmowaleX, Jul 25, 2007.

  1. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The following is from "African Beginnings" by Olivia Vlahos.

    "The Arabs came early to East Africa, and in the beginning, at least, they came in peace. They arrived in North Africa at a later date. And they came with the sword--the Sword of Islam."
     
  2. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Origin of the "Moors"


    The spread of Islam into north and west Africa was a process which took centuries to complete. The principal figure to successfully extend this conversion was none other than Abdallah ibn Yasin, founder of the Almoravid dynasty.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibn_Yasin

    It was the followers of ibn Yasin, known as the Marabouts, who defeated the armies of Ghana, which fell under the sword in 1062.
     
  3. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Timbuctoo

    Timbuctoo began its rise to fame as a trading center not long after Ghana fell to the Almoravids. The vast trading empire and the shy, silent people who produced the gold were both in time inherited by Mali, the kingdom of the Mandingo people, by then enthusiastically converted to Islam. In 1324, Mansa Musa, the Mali king, made a pilgrimage to Mecca. So prodical was his largesse, so dazzling his displays of gold and exotica from the Sudan, that the Moslem woorld began to think of Black Africa as Mansa Musa's realm entire.

    (Vlahos, p. 251)
     
  4. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Empire of MALI

    Mali territory had spread along with Mali's fame. Both Ghana and Tekrur had been annexed, and the Songhai kingdom--including its two chief river cities, Gao and Timbuctoo--had become a tributary. A century later the tributary swelled into the main stream, and Mali shrank to a brook.

    (Vlahos, p. 252)
     
  5. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Based upon MY OWN INDEPENDENT RESEARCH, I have traced MY ANCESTRAL ROUTES on my Father's side through TWO maternal Ancestors with the names "Moses" and "Cissy". Both are "survivalisms" of the names Mossi and Cisse.

    In modern terms, this is equated with Origins from Burkino faso, or what is historically known as the Mossi States, with specific origin from GHANA.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mossi_Kingdoms
     
  6. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The BLACK "More" or "Moors"


    The Dagomba are a people of Northern Ghana. They inhabit the sparse West African savanna region below the Sahel belt, known as the Sudan (not to be confused with the country). They speak the Dagbani language which belongs to the More-Dagbani sub-group of Gur languages. The More/Mossi now have their homeland in present day Burkina Faso, while the Dagbani sub-group today has broken up into three ethnic groups: The Dagbamba, the Mamprusi and the Nanumba.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagomba
     
  7. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Legend of Ancestress Yennenga


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/africa/features/fespaco/stallion.shtml

    "Yennenga was a beautiful young woman. Everyone loved her. She was also an extraordinary horse-woman. She rode horses much better than her brothers, and even better than the kingdom's warriors. She was also a brave warrior, adept at using javelins, spears and bows."

    Note:

    At this point, I encourage the reader to THINK independently and VISUALISE a young African woman riding a horse in battle, using javelins, spears and bows.

    What IMAGE comes to mind?

    What childhood memories do you have of "colored people" or "natives" associated with horses, bows and arrows?
     
  8. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Legacy of Yennenga


    It is important to note that Yennenga is just of of many Black Warrior-Women in African folklore and a book that may be of interest to some is "Market Women:Black Women Entrepreneurs--Past, Present, and Future by Cheryl A. Smith.

    Google Book Search will provide the link to this fascinating book which also focuses on some important and often ignored historcial Black Women with a rich cultural heritage and legacy of Resistance.
     
  9. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    An important point concerning the Mossi.


    "The Mossi successfully defended their new home from Mandinka and Songhai Muslims and even captured territory in Mali at times. They followed and still follow traditional African faiths."
     
  10. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Tengkodogo

    "The first Mossi kingdom was Tengkodogo also known as Tenkodogo. It was formed in 1120 in present-day Tenkodogo of Burkina Faso. The ruler of the kingdom was called the Naaba and his capital was also called Tenkodogo (from which the kingdom gets its name)."

    The title of "Naaba" has "survived" in two principle forms among Africans in the "americas".

    One is the word "Baba", which translates as Father. The other is the word "Bubba", which translates as "older or elder Brother". BOTH are "hereditary titles" used for Elder Siblings.
     
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