Ghana : African Americans Repatriate to Ghana .

HODEE

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Thanks Brother skuderjaymes

I enjoyed the video's and all of the information learned watching them.

Locals don't consider the returning African Americans as Black. Just because of the color of our skin (they get called Abruni-white)

http://www.gapyear.com/boards/viewthread/6917
Things are pretty disorganized in Ghana-people don’t understand the concept of time, I don’t think so at first it can be a little frustrating.
=========================
If you have the funds and just want to spend a few weeks in Ghana - this is one of the best volunteer groups that give you more freedom ( to sight see, lounge, and work with the people of Ghana ) and better organized than some others. I would do something like this as my first trip to Africa.


Volunteer work Ghana
Going to Ghana as a student volunteer is a great way to make a contribution to a developing country, and you’ll see real results even on a short visit. You can care for children in orphanages, help out with volunteer work on healthcare projects or teach in local schools.​
One thing I've learned about life is if you help others you actually benefit, learn a lot, receive blessing, get or help yourself.

If your plate is full ( you have a skill set, material items or you don't support others ) in life there is room for more blessings for you.

http://www.realgap.com/ghana





1 March 2014 2 weeks $1,039
Available​
1 March 2014 3 weeks $1,249
Available​
1 March 2014 4 weeks $1,279
Available​
1 March 2014 5 weeks $1,489
Available​
1 March 2014 6 weeks $1,699
Available​
1 March 2014 7 weeks $1,909
Available​
1 March 2014 8 weeks $2,109
Available​
1 March 2014 9 weeks $2,319
Available​
1 March 2014 10 weeks $2,549
Available​
1 March 2014 11 weeks $2,749
Available​
1 March 2014 12 weeks $2,979
Available​



To get a detailed PDF of information for this trip including full itinerary, country guides and travel advice on visas, money, insurance and the local weather, download our trip notes. By doing so you’ll also be kept updated on all the latest news, offers and stories on this particular trip. Happy reading!
What's included?
  • Accommodation
  • 3 meals per day
  • Arrival airport transfer
  • Departure airport transfer
  • Assistance of in-country team
  • Orientation
What's not included?
  • Flights
  • Travel Insurance
  • Visas
  • Items of a personal nature such as drinks and optional excursions etc
  • Transport between your accommodation and project
Additional Information & FAQs
Minimum age
Minimum 17 years with written parental consent, maximum decided on potential participants’ health.
Accommodation
Throughout your placement in Ghana you will be accommodated in a shared volunteer house in Teshie, near the capital city of Accra. Centrally located, you are in easy reach of local shops, banks, bars and even the beach!
You’ll be sharing a room with other participants on the program, normally there are between 4 and 8 people sharing a room. There are also shared bathroom facilities including toilets and showers.
The house is basic but comfortable and has some lovely communal areas where you can chill out during your free time and socialize with fellow participants.
Meals
Three meals per day will be provided for you, the food will be basic but nutritious.
Transport from your accommodation to your project each day is not included in the program, so you will need to make your own way to and fro. During the first few days of your program, a member of our in-country team will accompany you to show you how to use the local transport system and ensure that you are happy and comfortable doing so before you start making the journey on your own.
Advice & Safety
Throughout your program you will have the support and guidance of the program coordinator and team. You will be provided with competent assistance and help with any questions or advice you may need during your stay.
You will be assigned personal travel advisors who will co-ordinate your program with you. Feel free to contact them at any time before you go, or when you are on your travels.
In addition, you will have access to a 24 hour emergency contact number so you can contact one of our UK staff at any time should you need to.
DBS
This trip requires a Police Check to be carried out - please contact us for further information on how to do this.
 

RAPTOR

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Sep 12, 2009
6,896
3,607
The gentleman in the first (top) clip said the reason why they didn't
receive the warm welcome was because the locals did not know
them and they did not know the locals. I've experienced that
where I'm from among black folk (in this country), so...

The lady at the 9:17 mark, said "they" the locals, "don't know the
history. They don't know who we are..."

However,

Like the sista said at the 2:02 mark, "we make no apologies to
anyone, for what we are doing. Or how we are doing it".
 

Blackbird

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jan 31, 2004
3,969
1,815
Da Desert, literally
The gentleman in the first (top) clip said the reason why they didn't
receive the warm welcome was because the locals did not know
them and they did not know the locals. I've experienced that
where I'm from among black folk (in this country), so...

The lady at the 9:17 mark, said "they" the locals, "don't know the
history. They don't know who we are..."

However,

Like the sista said at the 2:02 mark, "we make no apologies to
anyone, for what we are doing. Or how we are doing it".
The grim reality is just because you are Black doesn't guarantee any warmth or acceptance from other Black people. Also, just because we have an affinity to Africa and wish to live there, be part of the society there, and contribute to its growth and development doesn't mean we will be welcomed with open arms.

I have even noticed the extreme prejudice and stereotypes among some Ghanaians towards Nigerians. Eventhough my mother in law doesn't go out of her way to talk down about Nigerians, I noticed that whenever a Nigerian does something "wrong", "unethical", or "inappropriate" in her eyes, she is quick say something judgmental about all Nigerian people, ex. "You know those Nigerians, man, they are some greedy people, man, eh."

I don't know about in Ghana, but Ghanaians in the States called African Americans - those doncatti people. I don't know what it means but the tone and context it is said and used in doesn't appear to be too flattering. I noticed that some Africans tend to have a less than positive view of Africans from other countries. Liberians are murders and prostitutes, Cote d' Ivorians are beggers. Togolese are fetish worshippers. Nigerians are crooks, thiefs and cutthroats, Ghanaians are snobby, aloof crooks. So on and so forth... So just imagine how African Americans may be perceived by those who have no true direct and intimate contact with us but are feed the b/s. However, I noticed the Africans that have said negative comments about other Africans can just as easily switch to a one African brotherhood when an African does something great in the mainstream world. My mother in law will pray with Nigerians or call Nigerian women "my sistah."

The other thing is sometimes repatriated African Americans are viewed as interlopers, invaders with no right to settle there without some kinship claim. We are no different than Europeans because we have no real claim to land of Akuapem, for example, if we are not Akuapem. This also speaks to what I was saying in the As We Pretend thread.

However, one brother from my hometown found out that he was direct descendant of last chief of the Ghanaian town of Ho. He was welcomed as a son returned because his blood is from there and he even met his family. So his claim was legitimized and justified due to his inheritance and ancestry.

Whether the local people don't know the history or don't know who we are, I have been told by a few African people that is actually us, African Americans, who don't know who we are. Even if we say we are African people, wear dashikis and kente cloth, picked up a couple words, eat fufu and plantains, present ourselves in a respectful manner, once we switch from the western world to the African world, none of that means nothing but imitation if we are not connected to a group of people, some kinship group with claim.

Bottom line is in many more rural places in Africa, a good natured and genuine African American that just plops down out of nowhere is no better than obruni because he is trying to settle land that he has no right to. It doesn't if the government says he can. I am not saying that repatriated Black folks follow proper traditional protocol, like getting the clan head's permission to settle, which is important to do but from my understanding of traditional African thought and land ownership, if the repatriated settlers are not blood or family with local people, then local attitudes will see them as people with no right to settle - no matter the intent of new settlers. If you think this view held by some African is wrong, then what was so wrong with the peaceful white settlers planting crops of Native American land?
 

Akanyi Kwesi

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Dec 30, 2013
48
47
Tarkwa, Ghana
The grim reality is just because you are Black doesn't guarantee any warmth or acceptance from other Black people. Also, just because we have an affinity to Africa and wish to live there, be part of the society there, and contribute to its growth and development doesn't mean we will be welcomed with open arms.I have even noticed the extreme prejudice and stereotypes among some Ghanaians towards Nigerians. Eventhough my mother in law doesn't go out of her way to talk down about Nigerians, I noticed that whenever a Nigerian does something "wrong", "unethical", or "inappropriate" in her eyes, she is quick say something judgmental about all Nigerian people, ex. "You know those Nigerians, man, they are some greedy people, man, eh."I don't know about in Ghana, but Ghanaians in the States called African Americans - those doncatti people. I don't know what it means but the tone and context it is said and used in doesn't appear to be too flattering. I noticed that some Africans tend to have a less than positive view of Africans from other countries. Liberians are murders and prostitutes, Cote d' Ivorians are beggers. Togolese are fetish worshippers. Nigerians are crooks, thiefs and cutthroats, Ghanaians are snobby, aloof crooks. So on and so forth... So just imagine how African Americans may be perceived by those who have no true direct and intimate contact with us but are feed the b/s. However, I noticed the Africans that have said negative comments about other Africans can just as easily switch to a one African brotherhood when an African does something great in the mainstream world. My mother in law will pray with Nigerians or call Nigerian women "my sistah."The other thing is sometimes repatriated African Americans are viewed as interlopers, invaders with no right to settle there without some kinship claim. We are no different than Europeans because we have no real claim to land of Akuapem, for example, if we are not Akuapem. This also speaks to what I was saying in the As We Pretend thread.However, one brother from my hometown found out that he was direct descendant of last chief of the Ghanaian town of Ho. He was welcomed as a son returned because his blood is from there and he even met his family. So his claim was legitimized and justified due to his inheritance and ancestry.Whether the local people don't know the history or don't know who we are, I have been told by a few African people that is actually us, African Americans, who don't know who we are. Even if we say we are African people, wear dashikis and kente cloth, picked up a couple words, eat fufu and plantains, present ourselves in a respectful manner, once we switch from the western world to the African world, none of that means nothing but imitation if we are not connected to a group of people, some kinship group with claim.Bottom line is in many more rural places in Africa, a good natured and genuine African American that just plops down out of nowhere is no better than obruni because he is trying to settle land that he has no right to. It doesn't if the government says he can. I am not saying that repatriated Black folks follow proper traditional protocol, like getting the clan head's permission to settle, which is important to do but from my understanding of traditional African thought and land ownership, if the repatriated settlers are not blood or family with local people, then local attitudes will see them as people with no right to settle - no matter the intent of new settlers. If you think this view held by some African is wrong, then what was so wrong with the peaceful white settlers planting crops of Native American land?
Enough said Nana Blackbird. Yet there are still some of we the youth who are enlightened enough to embrace our brothers from Aborokyir.
 

Akanyi Kwesi

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Dec 30, 2013
48
47
Tarkwa, Ghana
The grim reality is just because you are Black doesn't guarantee any warmth or acceptance from other Black people. Also, just because we have an affinity to Africa and wish to live there, be part of the society there, and contribute to its growth and development doesn't mean we will be welcomed with open arms.I have even noticed the extreme prejudice and stereotypes among some Ghanaians towards Nigerians. Eventhough my mother in law doesn't go out of her way to talk down about Nigerians, I noticed that whenever a Nigerian does something "wrong", "unethical", or "inappropriate" in her eyes, she is quick say something judgmental about all Nigerian people, ex. "You know those Nigerians, man, they are some greedy people, man, eh."I don't know about in Ghana, but Ghanaians in the States called African Americans - those doncatti people. I don't know what it means but the tone and context it is said and used in doesn't appear to be too flattering. I noticed that some Africans tend to have a less than positive view of Africans from other countries. Liberians are murders and prostitutes, Cote d' Ivorians are beggers. Togolese are fetish worshippers. Nigerians are crooks, thiefs and cutthroats, Ghanaians are snobby, aloof crooks. So on and so forth... So just imagine how African Americans may be perceived by those who have no true direct and intimate contact with us but are feed the b/s. However, I noticed the Africans that have said negative comments about other Africans can just as easily switch to a one African brotherhood when an African does something great in the mainstream world. My mother in law will pray with Nigerians or call Nigerian women "my sistah."The other thing is sometimes repatriated African Americans are viewed as interlopers, invaders with no right to settle there without some kinship claim. We are no different than Europeans because we have no real claim to land of Akuapem, for example, if we are not Akuapem. This also speaks to what I was saying in the As We Pretend thread.However, one brother from my hometown found out that he was direct descendant of last chief of the Ghanaian town of Ho. He was welcomed as a son returned because his blood is from there and he even met his family. So his claim was legitimized and justified due to his inheritance and ancestry.Whether the local people don't know the history or don't know who we are, I have been told by a few African people that is actually us, African Americans, who don't know who we are. Even if we say we are African people, wear dashikis and kente cloth, picked up a couple words, eat fufu and plantains, present ourselves in a respectful manner, once we switch from the western world to the African world, none of that means nothing but imitation if we are not connected to a group of people, some kinship group with claim.Bottom line is in many more rural places in Africa, a good natured and genuine African American that just plops down out of nowhere is no better than obruni because he is trying to settle land that he has no right to. It doesn't if the government says he can. I am not saying that repatriated Black folks follow proper traditional protocol, like getting the clan head's permission to settle, which is important to do but from my understanding of traditional African thought and land ownership, if the repatriated settlers are not blood or family with local people, then local attitudes will see them as people with no right to settle - no matter the intent of new settlers. If you think this view held by some African is wrong, then what was so wrong with the peaceful white settlers planting crops of Native American land?
Enough said Nana Blackbird. Yet there are still some of we the youth who are enlightened enough to embrace our brothers from Aborokyir.
 

HODEE

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
http://www.spyghana.com/ama-ghana-dont-love-till-go-yonder/
Thu, Jan 16th, 2014
Ama Ghana We Dont Love Till We Go Yonder

Ama Ghana’s prominence started resonating from the days the first Europeans arrived and nick-named her Gold Coast. It started stamping its beauty and ambidexterity among her peers when the struggle of independence started. She finally gain love and became a beacon of hope for Africa’s liberation.
Independent attainment got us on an industrial path and we became a delight for many other nations from Africa to the diaspora. Her sons and daughters started exploit in many endeavors.

But today, her own children run to seek greener pastures most especially based on movies featuring beautiful scenery of other develop countries. Stories told by family and friends back home from ‘abrokyire’(western) world wet the appetite of many.
'abrokyire'(western) world

Many wish they can tell their stories but who will listen? This are abled hardworking Ghanaians, we back home does not see meaning in their suffering when they tell it. Many don’t know what to say,i if dear ones call. Many are simply on AWOL.
Many I spoke with will tell you, if anyone says Ghana is difficult then they don’t know what Ama Ghana has and her value. One asked what is more painful than to die without knowing what will happen next because “Obi manso ooh”

'Obi manso ooh' meaning 'foreign land'.

They advised; never just believe what you see on TV and tales “burgers” say.

Yes some make it, only few are genuine. The jobs graduates will not even open an eye to, in the abrokyire world it’s a hot cake. If you don’t have what it takes to get a decent job, it’s best to drink your “koko”

Let’s all build Ama Ghana, she has many to offer if we dedicate and commit to her development. And also we implore governments to put the rights structures in place to develop our mother land.

Long live Ama Ghana

Scofray Nana Yaw Yeboah
===========================

In Ghana, among the Akans and particularly with the Akyems, Ashanti and the Akuapim, Nana is used as the title of a King or a Queen, it signifies royalty. The stool name of kings and queens are always preceded by Nana. However, many people in Ghana use Nana as a name in normal life. In some cases, people who are named after kings may, out of respect for mentioning the king's name adopt the name "Nana" to signify that they have been named after a king. In Ghana one may respectfully refer to a King or a Queen as Nana without mentioning the full name of that King or Queen.
 

HODEE

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
These are some things that make me go.... Ummmm


Is Africa shaped up by Ethiopia like a Rhino Horn?

In that same location, up by Ethiopia does that look like a Crown on a Man's Head?
Is Kenya located and in the shape of an Eye?

Mozambique a Nose?
Zimbabwe a Mouth?
South Africa a Chin?

DR Congo a Cheek Bone?
All of the other Nations completing the formation of the back of a Man's Head?

All of Africa is shaped like a face.

Does Africa also look like a gun?
Ethiopia is the hammer
If it does where is the trigger?

https://www.google.com/maps/@15.8287107,31.04735,3z
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Nov 17, 2006
51,990
11,211
The grim reality is just because you are Black doesn't guarantee any warmth or acceptance from other Black people. Also, just because we have an affinity to Africa and wish to live there, be part of the society there, and contribute to its growth and development doesn't mean we will be welcomed with open arms.

I have even noticed the extreme prejudice and stereotypes among some Ghanaians towards Nigerians. Eventhough my mother in law doesn't go out of her way to talk down about Nigerians, I noticed that whenever a Nigerian does something "wrong", "unethical", or "inappropriate" in her eyes, she is quick say something judgmental about all Nigerian people, ex. "You know those Nigerians, man, they are some greedy people, man, eh."

I don't know about in Ghana, but Ghanaians in the States called African Americans - those doncatti people. I don't know what it means but the tone and context it is said and used in doesn't appear to be too flattering. I noticed that some Africans tend to have a less than positive view of Africans from other countries. Liberians are murders and prostitutes, Cote d' Ivorians are beggers. Togolese are fetish worshippers. Nigerians are crooks, thiefs and cutthroats, Ghanaians are snobby, aloof crooks. So on and so forth... So just imagine how African Americans may be perceived by those who have no true direct and intimate contact with us but are feed the b/s. However, I noticed the Africans that have said negative comments about other Africans can just as easily switch to a one African brotherhood when an African does something great in the mainstream world. My mother in law will pray with Nigerians or call Nigerian women "my sistah."

The other thing is sometimes repatriated African Americans are viewed as interlopers, invaders with no right to settle there without some kinship claim. We are no different than Europeans because we have no real claim to land of Akuapem, for example, if we are not Akuapem. This also speaks to what I was saying in the As We Pretend thread.

However, one brother from my hometown found out that he was direct descendant of last chief of the Ghanaian town of Ho. He was welcomed as a son returned because his blood is from there and he even met his family. So his claim was legitimized and justified due to his inheritance and ancestry.

Whether the local people don't know the history or don't know who we are, I have been told by a few African people that is actually us, African Americans, who don't know who we are. Even if we say we are African people, wear dashikis and kente cloth, picked up a couple words, eat fufu and plantains, present ourselves in a respectful manner, once we switch from the western world to the African world, none of that means nothing but imitation if we are not connected to a group of people, some kinship group with claim.

Bottom line is in many more rural places in Africa, a good natured and genuine African American that just plops down out of nowhere is no better than obruni because he is trying to settle land that he has no right to. It doesn't if the government says he can. I am not saying that repatriated Black folks follow proper traditional protocol, like getting the clan head's permission to settle, which is important to do but from my understanding of traditional African thought and land ownership, if the repatriated settlers are not blood or family with local people, then local attitudes will see them as people with no right to settle - no matter the intent of new settlers. If you think this view held by some African is wrong, then what was so wrong with the peaceful white settlers planting crops of Native American land?


Brother Blackbird, you have written a mouthful, well said and well put indeed.

It is a grim reality we face as African people, across the board, and no one could frame the issues any better than you have with this post; so I will not attempt to improve on your words.

But on purpose, let's start and stop with Liberia, one of your favorites (West Africa). It was Repatriation without any form of Reparations which started that colony's (Land of the Free) downfall. There is no better place for so-called African Americans to repatriate, another grim reality we must face. The mere history of Liberia dictates this move, with a central focus to correct the wrongs done to the local people, the Dey and Bassa peoples, some of our upline relatives.

Therefore, until we understand, teach and correct our story, which is to say, this story of Liberia, there can be no better meaningful engagement with our African people than this. Liberia was a starting point that went bad, it has to be set straight, and until we face the grim reality of this music, all else fails ... the Return of Obruni.
 
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