Black Education / Schools : African American English in Education

Discussion in 'Black Education / Schools' started by CHoff, Aug 19, 2013.

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  1. CHoff

    CHoff New Member MEMBER

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    I am currently conducting research on the topic of African American English in education (or the “African American English Vernacular”, or “Ebonics”, or whatever term you prefer) to gain a better insight into the linguistic experiences of African American students in different educational settings. Since the teachers’ lack of understanding of English vernaculars and the disadvantaging treatment (whether it be done consciously or unconsciously) of African American English speakers can have numerous other negative consequences (e.g. denial of challenging academic instruction, labeling as learning disabled, denial of funding etc.) it remains an extremely important topic up to this day. Yet, it often continues to be overlooked. I wanted to use this discussion to find out what you guys and girls think about it. In order to have a basis of discussion, I would suggest filling out the survey I prepared. So, I would really appreciate if you could spare about 5 minutes to quickly reminisce about your childhood and tell me about your own linguistic experiences at school (no matter your current age; and you do not necessarily need to be an African American English speaker yourself, you just need to have an opinion on the topic, that’s all) by answering the nine short questions of my survey:


    #1) Basic information: Age, gender and where did you attend school (elementary, middle, and high school)?

    #2) Do you speak African American English?
    a) No, not at all (I don’t know how to speak it)
    b) No, but I know how to speak it
    c) Only in certain situations / in a certain environment / with certain people
    d) Yes, most of the time
    e) Yes, (almost) all the time
    f) Other:

    #3) In what setting (e.g. home, circle of friends, school) did you learn African American English and how did you acquire the English “standard”? Briefly explain.

    #4) At school [elementary/middle/high school], did you or someone else ever feel that your African American English form of speech posed a language barrier for you in one way or another?
    a) No
    b) Yes (Briefly explain)

    #5) At school [elementary/middle/high school], did you ever feel discriminated or at disadvantage as a result of your African American English form of speech? If so, did you ever voice this problem?
    a) No, I never felt discriminated or at disadvantage as a result of AAE
    b) Yes, I felt discriminated or at disadvantage as a result of AAE. (Briefly explain)

    #6) As an African American English speaker: How was your language treated at school? (By teachers, African American students, non-African American students, the school administration or other employees.) Please explain.

    #7) Do you think that African American English should be taught at school [elementary/middle/high school]? If so, why?
    a) No, absolutely not
    b) Yes, just like Standard English is taught to/expected of African Americans, African American English should be taught to non-African American students
    c) African American English should be explicitly covered in one form or another as an official topic in order to improve students' cultural knowledge
    d) Other:

    #8) Are you aware of programs specifically designed for African American English speakers offered by your former school (e.g. to acquire Standard English), or have you maybe even benefited from one yourself?
    a) No, my school did not offer any, at least none that I’m aware of. Also, I don’t think there is any need
    b) No, my school did not offer any, at least none that I’m aware of; but I think they should
    c) Yes, my school offered programs designed to help African American English speakers and I took part in one
    d) Yes, my school offered programs designed to help African American English speakers but I did not take part in any
    e) Other:

    #9) Final thoughts: In your opinion, what does the ideal classroom look like (in regards to how African American English is handled by students, teachers, etc.)? What might be the benefits of programs designed specifically for African American English speakers? From what age and until what age do you think they could be beneficial? Last but not least, are there any other thoughts you would like to add on this topic as a whole?
     
  2. butterfly#1

    butterfly#1 going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Are you a member of the Black race? A BLACK educator? What.district do you represent.

    I asks these question because this.curriculum would be hard to be accepted in most school.systems. I believe in teaching proper English and correcting those who speak otherwise,.regardles of ethnicity.
     
  3. butterfly#1

    butterfly#1 going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    1. Female , attended schools, all levels in DISD...(Dallas).
    2. c
    3. I'm sure I spoke the language of my parents while growing up. My father was a business man (self employed)... my mother worked in odd jobs, mostly housewife.
    4. No
    5. We attended segregated schools, we spoke the same language and was corrected immediately.
    6. n/a
    7. a
    8. a
    9. I see no benefit in teaching this in any school. I notice that some teachers look over the improper use of the English language. This could because students are pretty rebellious these days and teachers fear them.

    I think I answered your questions, at least to my understanding.
     
  4. Kadijah

    Kadijah Banned MEMBER

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    It is the heighth of arrogance (white privilege?) to ask black people to allow them to 'pick our brains' (and in "essay" form, too boot!) by first-time posting strangers on this MB, i.e., to "further" their careers with NO benefit to the respondents. SMH
     
  5. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    :hello: CHoff ... Welcome Welcome Welcome ... :wave:

    Thanks for joining and sharing!

    We appreciate your interest in us, but are reluctant to be used so blatantly, for research purposes.

    I'm closing this thread, and wishing you success with the endeavor.

    Much Love and Peace.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
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