Black People : ADHD Awareness Month

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Blackbird, Oct 22, 2013.

  1. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    October is ADHD Awareness Month.

    Many of you may not know but I suffer from ADHD which is a neurobehavioral syndrome. It is a very annoying and aggravating problem caused by the way the brain uses and reabsorbs the neurotransmitters, norepinephrine and dopamine. It is definitely a real problem despite what many believe.

    Many of us may know someone affected by ADHD so I wanted to make you aware of it - if only slightly.
     
  2. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Millions of children and adults suffer from Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It is a term that has a household recall, but many people do not fully grasp what this learning disability really is. In an effort to educate[​IMG] everyone better about ADHD, October has been announced as ADHD Awareness Month.

    ADHD can affect any race, age, gender, religious background, socio-economic background, and IQ. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated in 2011 that 9.5 percent of children in the United States have ADHD. Boys have the condition two to three times more often than girls.
    Usually ADHD is coupled with anxiety disorder in 25-40 percent of adults and 30 percent in children. Depression is also diagnosed and treated in 70 percent of those who suffer from ADHD.

    Research has shown that ADHD is hereditary and based in the brain. Many symptoms of ADHD are linked to certain brain areas. ADHD is not caused by poor parenting, immorality, family issues, insufficient teachers and school, too much TV, food allergies, and/or excessive sugar.

    Sadly for those suffering from ADHD and don’t know they have it or have not treated it, ADHD might cause serious learning[​IMG] disabilities and may prevent someone from graduating in school.

    The symptoms associated with inattention in ADHD are: having a hard time following instructions, not listening, being easily distracted and bored after a few minutes, missing details, forgetting or losing things, constant daydreaming, and becoming easily confused.

    The symptoms associated with hyperactivity in ADHD are: fidgeting in seats, non-stop talking[​IMG], playing or touching anything in sight, being in constant motion, acting inappropriately and being unable to do quiet activities or tasks.
    http://guardianlv.com/2013/09/omega-3-fatty-acids-help-adhd-october-adhd-awareness-month/
     
  3. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    ADHD in Adults

    10 Adult ADHD Symptoms

    Adult ADHD Problem No. 1: Difficulty Getting Organized

    For people with ADHD, the increased responsibilities of adulthood -- bills, jobs, and children, to name a few -- can make problems with organization more obvious and more harmful than in childhood. While some ADHD symptoms are more annoying to other people than to the person with the condition, disorganization is often identified by adults struggling with ADHD as a major detractor that affects their quality of life.
    Adult ADHD Problem No. 2: Reckless Driving and Traffic Accidents

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder makes it hard to keep your attention on a task, so spending time behind the wheel of a car can be difficult. ADHD symptoms can make some people more likely to speed, have traffic accidents, and lose their driver’s licenses.
    Adult ADHD Problem No. 3: Marital Difficulties

    Many people without ADHD have marital problems, of course, so a troubled marriage shouldn’t be seen as a red flag for adult ADHD. But there are some marriage problems that are particularly likely to affect the relationships of those with ADHD. Often, the partners of people with undiagnosed ADHD take poor listening skills and an inability to honor commitments as a sign that their partner doesn’t care. If you’re the person suffering from ADHD, you may not understand why you’re partner is upset, and you may feel you’re being nagged or blamed for something that’s not your fault.

    http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/10-symptoms-adult-adhd
     
  4. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    ADHD is a severe condition that comes along with several possible comorbid conditions that make the treatment of ADHD very complex.. Unfortunately, I personally suffer from more than a couple of these comorbid problems along with my ADHD. Some of those comorbid problems are:

    1. Anxiety disorder
    2. Major Depressive Disorder
    3. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
    4. Bipolar Disorder
    5. Personality Disorders

    Eventhough I am still a child of Elegua and love it every bit. My ADHD gives me a different perspective of the world and the people that inhabit it. But also being a child of Elegua does too.

    So yes, I am mentally ill, but my mental illness is no different than someone with diabetes, hypertension, asthma, sickle cell anemia and the like. Most would not know I was mentally ill unless someone told them.
     
  5. Angela22

    Angela22 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have ADHD; I didn't really know October was the month of awareness for it. I guess I don't really look too far into it, though it does affect my life significantly.

    Thanks for sharing. Not everyone with the condition feels comfortable doing so, since people judge so easily as you "being crazy" or "just not trying". There's a whole lot more to it, I've learned over the years.:D
     
  6. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Angela, thanks for sharing as well. Yes, there is a lot of stigma about ADHD. I am often called "irresponsible", "inconsiderate", "lazy", "selfish" or told "you need to focus", "you are not trying hard enough" and everything else.

    I work in the mental health field and even among mental health professionals there is a lot of archaic information and beliefs about ADHD, it's etiology and the impact it has on the global functioning of someone affected by it. As a result, there are still plenty of archaic or ill-informed treatment styles being practiced to remedy the symptomology of the condition.

    I presently take Adderall. Which works pretty good besides the weight loss. Are you on any medicine?

    Do you belong to any support groups?
     
  7. Fieldpea

    Fieldpea Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Wow...I'd forgotten about ADHD month. I used to get the newsletter.



    My youngest son was diagnosed with ADHD coupled with an auditory learning disability. He even had a 'violence component' to his ADHD. His very first nickname, earned once he learned to crawl, was BUZZ SAW. His symptoms were dominant from infancy! For years, I had no idea what was wrong with my child. I thought, sometimes, that he'd been born insane. He was unlike any kind of child I'd ever heard of. Taking care of him was fulltime and INTENSE! Yet, thank the Creator that I had him diagnosed.


    My father--though un-diagnosed--was ABSOLUTELY ADHD, a crazed workaholic, and a *perfectionist*--this perfectionist aspect to his ADHD surfaced sporadically, but daily, and caused us kids to 'face his rages' for our *not getting it* (whatever he was ranting about at the time). My oldest sister was ADHD, bright and savvy, calculating and manipulative--and had one of the best senses of humor and irony that I've ever been exposed to. One of my brothers was ADD, so very promising academically, but prone to depression by the time he turned 13 or so (un-diagnosed). He wound up alcohol and drug dependent, and in the end he developed the habit of *not finishing* anything he'd begun to work towards. He's lead a hard life because of his ADHD. My baby sister is ADHD, and her capacity for depression has hurt her in many ways. Only her brilliance, academically, allowed her to become successful career-wise; however, in her personal life that kid has been through the wringer. She suffers compulsiveness, too.


    Others among my dad's side of the family also suffer from ADHD and ADD (now that I know the signs and how to recognize the behaviors), I realized years ago that it HAS to be inherited.


    I should say that my son was the 'first' in my family (my father and my sibs) to be formally tested and diagnosed by an educational psychologist who worked for my son's elementary school district. For ALL of his school years, my son either took one dose of Ritalin per day, or--after he got some size on him--my son was switched to Adderal. Please believe me, my little family also went to family classes, parenting classes for me, counselling from 7th to 12th grade, and for the first 4 years, my son saw an *outstanding, BRILLIANT child psychologist*--off the chain, superb professional. My youngster had a medical psychiatrist that he had to meet with monthly, too, in tandem with counselling.


    Today, he is what I call a *total square*. I somehow managed to keep him away from banging, or becoming a menace to himself and others, compulsively. He hasn't taken Adderal for about 5 years (this go-around). He's determined to live life without the meds (if you don't count bud). Despite going through his rough patches, emotionally, he leans heavily on the kinds of life skills that he was taught when he was little, up to when he completed counselling at age 19 (he's 29 now). That, and coming over to my house to vent (I'm one of the few people he knows who *knows* how to hear him, and knows how to guide him through some of his upsets).


    I've made sure over the years that many of my relatives (his cousins in particular) knows how to 'hear him, too' and they have their own ways of coaxing him away from excessive dramatics as they've always run the streets together. They watch his back, and he listens to them.


    So far, so good.


    One Love, and PEACE
     
  8. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Wow. Awesome testament. I wish your son well. ADHD definitely has a genetic component and runs through families a lot.

    I am prone to both depression and anxiety. I am also slightly OCD. My struggles have been throughout life.

    In grade school, I would often get out of my seat and run around the classroom touching classmates on the head. The teacher would have to call my name to get me to stop. Once I returned back to my seat, I would have a difficult time staying still, constantly squirming and twisting. I don't recall ever doing homework or studying for a test. I never took notes in class or turned in most of my homework, book reports and the like. I didn't learn how to multiply or divide until I was 19 years old. I didn't learn how to tie my shoe laces until I was 11.

    Eventually, I dropped out of high school. 1/3 of the high school students with ADHD either never finish high school or experience a delayed graduation. I earned my GED through Job Corps. Similarly, college students ADHD have a much lower graduation rate than non-ADHD college students. College was a struggle also but I finally made it. Your son is brave. It's hard to control my symptoms without my meds. I tend to go off of them for at least a week or two.

    What ADHD does is it helps to hold one back for a life they have the aptitude of living; however, eventhough still difficult, one can live a fulfilling life with ADHD.
     
  9. Angela22

    Angela22 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Not on any meds, no. I try to "rough it out", so to speak. Over the past few years, I'd been doing very well, without letting it be a big factor in my life. But after my sister recently passed away, it sort of "resurfaced" and has been almost full force.

    I do, at times, feel like I'm not trying hard enough to manage since I've shown I can actually do it, but it's so very difficult to get a hold on this. I suffer with bipolar disorder, as well.

    And no support groups specifically aimed around my condition, but my church is very supportive of me when they see me struggling with it. :)
     
  10. Fieldpea

    Fieldpea Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Angela22, you might benefit from the newsletter I mentioned to Blackbird. Offhand, I don't remember the name of it, anymore. I do remember that I got as much benefit (hope) from the articles and studies about adults dealing with ADHD as I did the articles on how parents needed to 'raise' such kids.


    I took a look online and came up with this site:

    http://psychcentral.com/newsletter/adhd/


    I used to receive my newsletters in the mail every week. One of my aunts (my dad's sister) paid the yearly subscription fees for me as I was chronically poor for in excess of 20+ years behind caring for this one son. There was no way that I could return to work after his birth--no daycare, he was so combative and destructive of property--so I and my two sons stayed hand to mouth for many years. Anyway, through the family grapevine, she'd learned of my son's struggles (and mine). Out of the blue, she called me --something that had never happened before--and she just told me to expect the ADHD newsletters in the mail from then on.


    I got a newsletter each week until just after he graduated high school (he was almost 20). Again, like Blackbird said, ADHD kids tend to graduate behind their peers. I had to enroll him into a charter high school just so he could have a chance to graduate at all (by Az state statute, he was just plain too old to even start his senior year).


    I only explored the site a little bit, but it does look like the newsletters that I received in the mail.


    One Love, and PEACE
     
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