Black People : Accused of not being "Black" enough?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Coach707, Jan 31, 2006.

  1. Coach707

    Coach707 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I know you all may know this already or you're probably going through something of this effect in your own lives, but why do many black people feel like you're a sell out if you know how to play the part effectively in this white man's world? If you show up late to work, wearing what you want-how you want, taking loud on a cell phone, and communicating with your superiors in broken English (Ebonics) is it suppose to be acceptable behavior? At the same time when the companies overlook us for promotions, and deny us for that raise, we want to yell racism and threaten to call the NAACP!

    Are black people really branded with the ghetto this deep? If so, then I believe that our very own culture and way of life (which we as well as people of other ethnic backgrounds passionately embrace) will continue to disconnect us from civilization and consequently we will exile ourselves! Anybody agree, disagree or have their own opinion?

    To add to the epidemic, the well spoken, hard working black Americans on the rise are almost instantly booted out of the neighborhoods where they grew up. These are the people that W.E. Dubois referred to in his speech "The Talented Tenth" yet instead of being embraced and loved for their will to look at life from a clear and necessary perspective, they are considered sell-outs.


    I know that each and every one of you has at least one friend that’s like this. If you speak proper English around them, they are offended. How many black children do you know that get called names at school by the other black kids for using proper English, or for dressing neatly? It’s a scary thing to have the whole world against you.

    It’s a shame that you can’t be about something revolutionary and still be recognized in the black community. It’s sad, but where I’m from Mr. Dope Man is holds more clout than the Great Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
     
  2. cursed heart

    cursed heart Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I've never had this problem!
    I grew up in a predominantly white neighborhood but my family was down to earth! I was educated in my home about who I am and I read alot!
    The outside world around me never changed my diction or values.
    Although in the workforce I speak correct english with a touch of soul to it!
    That's not talking white or acting white it's being a professional.
    I know white people with degrees that work in professional areas with tat's and pink hair!
    My family and friends are sometimes a bit jealous because of my accomplishments. They have made comments in anger saying I think I'm better than everybody and I donot act this way at all! But I'm the first one they call when they need something. How far you go in life depends on you!
    You overcome any triumphs from your upbringing and environment if you want to! Everybody wants to be somebody, but it takes a strong individual to actually acheive the best in life!
    If someone looks up to a drug dealer it's because they were not taught any better! Show them there is life outside of the ghetto!
    That some places are clean with fresh air and clear blue skies!
    That kids can run and play without dodging gun fire.
    That just because you are working for a low rate at a job, that soon they could own the place!
    Inspire,support and acknowledge through knowledge of where you came from and where you are going!
    Anything is possible!!!!!!!!!!!!:luvv:
     
  3. Coach707

    Coach707 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Great response! But I will say that you are fortunate. You obviously had a foundation already laid for you before you entered this world. There are kids that are trying to do the same things that you are that were born in some of the worse conditions imaginable. To these people the sky is a dark grey, polluted color. To them the there is no green grass, only project dirt. Lets understand that the struggle is real, and I salute any man that overcame the odds of the ghetto. But if you were never in the ghetto, how can you relate?
     
  4. cursed heart

    cursed heart Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    All of my family was there! Including my real father!
    You don't have to live there to relate to your people's struggle!
    We lived in the city until I was five.
    A man was climbing up our window with crates and my mother shot at him!
    After that she freaked out and they worked their a$$es off mama and step dad in a pawn shop they owned! My stepfather was a hustler baby and my mother was a stay at home mom/recording artist with 4 children!
    We have been poor before and without many times but they did whatever it took to make sure we had the best!
    I had options yes, but my parents could have easily been living in the ida b wells projects on dope! like a friend of mine that is now a fireman drug free!
    As a single adult with a child I lived in the city and saw alot and experienced alot! I put myself through school with a child in the ghetto after getting mugged,no furniture and drug addicts/gangs all around the area, working and going to school,no car, in a roach infested but clean small apartment on welfare! I love spam in the morning but I know now I can buy me a an entire lamb if I want!
    Their struggle and my struggle is the same, their is no difference!
     
  5. anAfrican

    anAfrican Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    nah, the direct accusation was never needed; can always see it in the "body language". true, it ain't always there immediately, but once i start talking and attempting to share thoughts, it just seems to grow ...

    the pain of feeling ostracized finally got so bad that i had to go find me someplace on the net where i could try to get back in touch.

    guess i better go find me a "dentist" so that i can get this "bad tooth out of my mouth" and stop constantly testing it! the pain is still there ... and grows daily ...

    anAfrican - a Tribe of One ...
     
  6. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    frankly, this sounds like a bunch of stereotypical thinking.
    i don't know black people like that.
    are you black?
     
  7. Coach707

    Coach707 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Last time I checked I was black, my brother. I seldom get stopped by the police for no apparent reason, I work twice as hard for respect in my place of business that people of much lighter skin seem to be given. I am far more likely than lighter skin people to have high cholesterol, diabetes and high blood pressure. I know what it feels like to be followed around a retail store, therefore, I dont think that my blackness is to be questioned here.


    Maybe you are in denial about the things that go on in the real world, my brother. with all do respect, the streotypes that are portrayed about black people ARE occouring all over America. If they were not, then they wouldnt be called stereotypes, they would be called myths or lies
     
  8. Riada

    Riada Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Well, James, I've known a bunch of Black folks like this. They've even done this to me, except my attitude has always been that they can kiss where the sun don't shine. I wasn't gon' self-destruct for nobody!!

    If you say or do anything that a certain element of Black people are unfamiliar with or can't do, or if you've been exposed to or feel comfortable with people, places, situations, and things that they haven't, then somehow this is threatening to them and makes them feel insecure. The next thing you know they're saying things like, "oh, you tryin to ack white."

    Working with Black youth and being around my nephews, I hear this all the time. One of my nephews was afraid to be seen at his high school carrying his bookbag or reading a book because he knew he'd be accused of "acting white." If a Black male is accused of acting white, that's worse than being called a homosexual these days in parts of the country.

    Acting white is reading books, trying to do well in school, doing what the teacher tells you to do, speaking appropriately, wearing your clothes the right way, having aspirations for the future, trying to avoid fights,and so on. That peer pressure to act Black is unbelievable and destructive. Many Black youth don't see that acting Black has no future. Some don't seem to care about a future or they care a lot more about being accepted by their peers who don't seem to care about a future.
     
  9. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    First of all, the phrase "why do Black people..." is just to judgemental of all Black people... We do not ALL think that way, nor do most of us think that way... In fact, I think you are talking more generationally, because I don't know no brothers or sisters my age that think that way... Must be the company I keep...

    And I doubt the kinda folk you're talking about run to the NAACP to holla racism about not getting a promotion... Unless you're saying that going to college taught these people how to act MORE Ghetto than the law allows... Besides the fact that talking loud on one's cell phone is not grounds to deny one a promotion if they're doing a marvelous job... Everyone I know talks LOUD - yeah, including WHITE FOLKS - on cell tellies, so that's some bogus stuff....

    Lastly, since this phrase "Black People", without using any specificity, was used far too often throughout your post for me to take what you're saying seriously... I wouldn't promote someone like you myself, because you're not showing me with your writting skills, an ability to rationalize, and consider the entire picture... Did White People teach you all this??? Did they brand you with their thoughts and ideas??? Seems they did... Tell me I'm wrong...



    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  10. anAfrican

    anAfrican Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    (oh, i'm sorry i took the extra effort to read that ... testing that dog gone tooth again! smh)

    if, when talking about some perceived attitudes that one has encountered while being among "Black people", shouldn't one speak of them as "Black people"? how should one, then, speak of "that segment of "Black people" that don't seem willing to open their hearts to ALL "Black people", even as they seek to speak to the notion of "Black solidarity""? must such a circumlocution as this be employed?
     
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