Black Spirituality Religion : A Question

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Blackbird, Dec 3, 2006.

  1. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,972
    Likes Received:
    1,819
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Hitman
    Location:
    Da Desert, literally
    Ratings:
    +1,820
    Are the Judeo-Christian tradition more important to the African Diaspora than let's say BaKongo tradition? If so, why?

    Also, why do we discuss Kemetic philosophy so? Are there any common themes and motifs that can connected among all the African traditions, which we can discuss that doesn't allow us to focus on one particular group?

    Blackbird (sprinkles tobacco and pours rum, praying to his power spirits and egun, for guidance - micco humma)
     
  2. nibs

    nibs Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    Messages:
    483
    Likes Received:
    22
    Ratings:
    +22
    (Blackbird) - Are the Judeo-Christian tradition more important to the African Diaspora than let's say BaKongo tradition? If so, why?

    absolutely not. you know that the reverse is true.

    (Blackbird) - Also, why do we discuss Kemetic philosophy so? Are there any common themes and motifs that can connected among all the African traditions, which we can discuss that doesn't allow us to focus on one particular group?

    there is no need to focus on one particular group. kemetic spirituality must be understood through the eyes of other african traditions, as that is where the continuous understanding is.
    kemet represents a time when african people were united, so in a sense kemet, when properly understood, should reflect not only the common themes of africans, but also illustrate how certain traditions were preserved and others lost with time.

    (Blackbird) - Blackbird (sprinkles tobacco and pours rum, praying to his power spirits and egun, for guidance - micco humma)

    the sad reality is that the judeo-christian bible, particularly the old testament, tells us that so many of our african traditions that represent the common themes you speak of; communicating with the spirits of those who have transitioned from this world, divination, incorporating visual aids like statues...etc.; acknowleding multiple manifestations of the supreme, and lesser manifestations that act as intermediaries...the old testament directly assaults these practices. and that is part of the problem with african's in the diaspora. these abrahamic doctrines have poisoned their minds towards the traditions of their ancestors.
     
  3. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,972
    Likes Received:
    1,819
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Hitman
    Location:
    Da Desert, literally
    Ratings:
    +1,820
    Ase! Thank you, Brother (?) Nibs.

    I appreciate you response. So few are able to discuss our ancestral traditions without an agenda of attaching, rather, corrupting them to fit into their mold of Eurocentric conditioning. I have argued that we waste too much energy trying to black-face systems that are diametrically opposed to our ancestral traditions. The completeness of the picture is fulfilled when we unapologeticallydeal with our sciences on their own terms and in their own images.

    Blackbird (thanks the egunwa that there are Ankobia among us)
     
  4. Music Producer

    Music Producer Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,810
    Likes Received:
    94
    Ratings:
    +94
    Absolutely!

    Because the Old Testament and Holy Scriptures is the only book that I have seen thus far that surmise in one continues conscious thought of the black mans history and walk with the Supreme Being. There does exist older text that the Old Testament were built from but the older text is scattered, unformed and does not set a historical point of reference, purpose and focus as to why it was written and to whom it is written to.

    It is one of the main sources of Old Testament theology and spirituality as to the Monotheist of Kemet. Deep knowledge of Kemet allows one that studies the Old Testament to make the Historical and conceptual links found in the Old Testament and actually allows one to date events found in the Old Testament.
    For Example:
    This is a story from an Egyptian Bible, “A LEGEND OF THE GOD KHNEMU AND OF A SEVEN YEARS' FAMINE”. It allows us to see where tithing comes from.

    "25 thy share.

    "Whatsoever is caught in the nets by every fisherman and by every fowler, and whatsoever is taken by the catchers of fish, and by the snarers of birds, and by every hunter of wild animals, and by every man who snareth lions in the mountains, when these things enter [the city] one tenth of them shall be demanded.

    "And of all the calves which are cast throughout the regions which are included in these measures, one tenth of their number

    "26 shall be set apart as animals which are sealed for all the burnt offerings which are offered up daily.

    "And, moreover, the gift of one tenth shall be levied upon the gold, ivory, ebony, spices, carnelians (?), sa wood, seshes spice, dum palm fruit (?), nef wood, and upon woods and products of every kind whatsoever, which the Khentiu, 2 and the Khentiu of Hen-Resu, 3 and the Egyptians, and every person whatsoever [shall bring in].

    http://www.sacred-texts.com/egy/leg/leg24.htm

    This Egyptian Bible predates the writings of Egypt when we started abandoning the Supreme Being for Osiris, Ra, Isis and other lesser gods. This particular Bible that clearly shows a Monotheistic thought dates to about the second dynasty which is around 3890BC.

    As you can clearly see the purpose of the Old Testament and Holy Scriptures is to return us back to the ways of our greatest ancestors before we lost respect for the Supreme Being. The Tenth offering to the Supreme Being is discussed in detail in the chapter of Leviticus, which clearly shows a pure return to the old, old ways.

    hope this helps.
     
  5. nibs

    nibs Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    Messages:
    483
    Likes Received:
    22
    Ratings:
    +22
    (Blackbird) - Also, why do we discuss Kemetic philosophy so? Are there any common themes and motifs that can connected among all the African traditions, which we can discuss that doesn't allow us to focus on one particular group?

    let's go over the common themes.

    spiritual hierarchy
    there is a stratification to existence.
    the creator - the ultimate source of all
    lesser deities - they maintain the universe/existence; manifest themselves as the divine forces behind nature and also can incarnate in human form (the have in the past); and also can use animals and nature to communicate & act on earth
    ancestral spirits - the ancestral spiritual energy that protects us, we are manifestations of this energy and it lives on through us and our children

    ancestor veneration
    the spirit of family does not disappear after the transition from the physical world. the spirit should be honored, nurtured, remembered. in turn, the spirit "looks after" it's family and can intervene on our behalf

    reincarnation within the family
    you reincarnate within your family/descendents. there is a spiritual division, spiritual energy drives what it has created. thus the spiritual energy of mankind is common, divisions within mankind is a subset of this energy, ethnic groups reflects a further division...etc. marriage is a union of branches of this spiritual energy.

    trance possession
    deities can manifest themselves through trance/possession. they can express themselves through dance; dance also communicates symbolically to the subconscious mind and to spiritual observers amongst us...

    divination
    other than your birth date, and the date you are supposed to die...everything else can be known through divination, and potentially altered for the better.

    initiation
    there are various types of initiation; knowledge is taught and revealed in various stages of initiation. a person's knowledge & spiritual growth occurs across lifetimes. not everyone has the same path, calling or goal...

    i think this reflects many of the basic similarities...there are additional similarities of a general variety; also there are additional similarities that are more specific; reflecting a particular symbolism, understanding...a unity in certain rituals...etc.
     
  6. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,972
    Likes Received:
    1,819
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Hitman
    Location:
    Da Desert, literally
    Ratings:
    +1,820
    Adupe Nibs,

    I agree with your response. These are basic themes that are fairly consistent throughout the mother continent. I believe it behooves us as African people to not isolate one particular group of people and use them as a focal point of discussion and debate, when we can look for commonalities to ponder on and expound upon. I am not saying to fall into a generic and generalized sense of African spirituality; definitely not.

    I am, what you would call, an cultural anthropologist by training, but an Orisa and Vodu devotee. As someone intimately affiliated with indigenous spiritual systems, I would not debate someone about the systems I follow or practice; there is information that can not be discussed and if were even discussed, most would not understand. However, my anthropologist mind is always thinking and looking for common theme or motifs that can connect the relationship systems have with each other.

    When we are debating whether a system is intrinsically African in origin or not, we must look at how it fits into the family of African thought and cosmology,as a whole. No, Africa is not monolithic, but we still should be able to identify origins. Whether it be from the Zar practice in the Sudan to the Hauka spirits among the Songhai or the Bokono of Togo to the Sangoma of South Africa. When we look at African traditional systems together as a whole, representing a phylum onto itself, we can began to appreciate the spearate traditions within a little bit more.

    Blackbird (asking my gbogbo for peace and prosperity after the solistice)
     
Loading...