Black People : A possible modality of collective urban sustenance

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, May 26, 2010.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Published on Tuesday, May 25, 2010

    by Civil Eats


    Is the Urban Farming Movement Here to Stay?
    by Vanessa Barrington

    Urban farming has the potential to help us take charge of the foods we eat, green our cities, build community, and increase food security for urban residents.

    Everyday, there's articles about backyard chickens, bee keeping, or urban yard sharing. Clearly urban agriculture is at the top of the trend pile. But is it just a trend, or a part of a sustainable future?

    Recently I attended a panel discussion in San Francisco at The Commonwealth Club (presented by INFORUM), about how today's urban farming movement began and where it's going. Attendees were treated to a variety of perspectives from four pitchfork-toting farmerpreneur leaders of the urban farming movement in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    Panelists included Jason Mark, co-manager of Alemany Farm; editor-in-chief, Earth Island Journal, Novella Carpenter, author of the book Farm City about her farm Ghost Town Farm, Christopher Burley, founder, Hayes Valley Farm, and David Gavrich (aka The Goat Whisperer), founder of City Grazing. The panel was moderated by Sarah Rich, writer; editor; co-founder, The Foodprint Project; and co-author, Worldchanging: A User's Guide for the 21st Century.

    The panel started off with a discussion about the most recent "back to the land" movement and how it differed from today's urban farming movement.

    Back in the 60s and 70s young people migrated back to the countryside to make a go of farming. Novella Carpenter's parents were part of that movement. But it didn't last. People found that growing food is very hard and rural life can be extremely isolating. The motives of today's generation of farmers are different, and more communitarian. They're not trying to drop out. They're trying to engage more fully with the world around them.

    "We're realizing that maybe there is a different way. We can stay in the cities and grow food where we live and it can serve as a model for sustainability, said Jason Mark. "There's not enough room for all of us in Sonoma."

    "We're all trying to find balance and bring the rural environment into the urban environment. We're trying to find that niche that we live in. Everyone who plants a seed is sowing a bit of sustainability," added Chris Burley.

    Though the movement is young, things are changing rapidly. According to David Gavrich, the goat whisperer. When his business, City Grazing, put an ad in Craigslist for "goat herder, San Francisco," they got 200 applications, and half of the applicants actually had goat experience. According to Gavrich, "people are yearning to get away from their desks".

    Urban farming does seem to be helping to revitalize neighborhoods and foster community. For example, Burley, of Hayes Valley Farm, who was featured here in a Q & A a couple of weeks back said that he was amazed to find that 50 people will consistently show up on a Thursday to shovel horse manure for four hours. Sunday work parties regularly attract 100 folks.


    http://www.commondreams.org/view/2010/05/25-6
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Something worth seriously looking into at ones next Block association meeting.

    The economy is not going through a slow recovery the economy is going through the last throws of a terminal illness called

    "almost zero infrastructure" as in 75% Outsourceing of what makes up the nations GDP.

    We as Afrcans in Americashould think seriously about collective purchasing of those abandoned lots and underpriced acreage in the rural areas and burbs,

    as well as have brainstorming sessions at family get togethers to provide, share and exchange knowledge about hydroponics, even among the children,

    something that anyone can do,
    to grow their own food,
    if they have room enough in their home for a large fish tank or terarium
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Food Shortages Coming? Famed Investor Jim Rogers Thinks So
    By BRUCE WATSON
    Posted 4:30 PM 01/15/10 Economy, Investing
    Comments Print Text Size A A A
    A severe food shortage is on its way, according to well-regarded investor Jim Rogers. Food inventories are the lowest in decades and "[m]any farmers cannot get loans to buy fertilizer now, even though we have big shortages developing," Rogers said on CNBC.

    For investors, that could mean a buying opportunity in commodities, in particular coffee and cotton, Rogers said. In fact, he says commodities are a much better buying opportunity than stocks right now.

    For the rest of us, a food shortage could mean skyrocketing food prices. "Sometime in the next few years, we're going to have very serious shortages of food everywhere in the world and prices are going to go through the roof," he said.


    See full article from DailyFinance: http://srph.it/b8WW2d


    This is no conspiracy theory.
    For the past 3 years all of us have seen our grocery dollars become practicaly valueless ,
    even since January that $100 worth of groceries is a much smaller bag then it was then
     
  4. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Nation of islam had been prepared for these types of things sincethe 60s,

    and the Final Call had this to say to us 2 years ago;

    U.S. hit by rising food prices

    While international leaders gathered to find solutions to the world food crisis, analysts in the United States braced for the April 16 Consumer Price Index Report. Analysts say the U.S. is wrestling with the worst food inflation in 17 years because of sharply higher costs for wheat, corn, soybeans and milk as well as higher energy and transportation costs.

    Deborah Khaliq of Atlanta, doesn’t understand all of the technical talk. She does know the price of everything she buys at the grocery store is going up. “Extremely high, and I’m telling you it is going up higher before it goes lower again,” Ms. Khaliq said.

    “A half-dozen eggs; a half a stick of butter, a loaf of bread and a half-gallon of milk costs $25,” she said.

    Ms. Khaliq noted that living in Atlanta, you can hear truckers complain about the rising cost of fuel. “We know firsthand that the droughts and the fuel costs are why our grocery bills are so high,” Ms. Khaliq said.

    USDA says American households still spend a smaller portion of their incomes for food than in other nations such as Poland where 22 percent of income goes to food, or 40 percent of income spent on food in Egypt and Vietnam.

    Still the cost of eggs alone jumped 25 percent, milk 13 percent and chicken nearly 7 percent in February, according to USDA.

    Other products showing steep increases: Bananas in 1991 cost .49 cents a pound, today the cost is .99 cents a pound, coffee was $2.93 per pound in 1991, now it’s $6.51 per pound; apples cost $1.69 per pound in 2008, up from .59 a pound in 1991; potatoes in 1991 were .86 per pound and hit $1.29 a pound in 2008, said USDA.

    The Agriculture Department said there is reason for concern about the U.S. food supply. In January, USDA reported that the “hard wheat crop” was much smaller than anticipated and U.S. stockpiles hit a 60-year low. The result has been an increase in prices for other commodities, which have tripled over the last two years.

    Officials at the commodity trading house, Bower Trading say the USDA report sets the stage for a wild ride in the marketplace for the rest of 2008. “Our stockpiles are down so low here in the United States, we really don’t have much room for error,” a trading official said.

    “It’s hard for most Americans to even conceive of the idea that food could become scarce in this country,” said Raj Patel, a writer, activist and former policy analyst with the advocacy group Food First and analyst for the World Bank, World Trade Organization and the United Nations. “Few of us are paying attention to the close relationship between bio-fuel, grain crops and price inflation,” Mr. Patel told Democracy Now’s Amy Goodman. He was appearing on her Pacifica Radio show, to push his new book, “Stuffed & Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System.” The book is due out April 25. Competition between corn and other crops for planting acres has driven up the price of food in the U.S., as the government mandates more acreage for corn, wheat and soybeans, ingredients needed for ethanol production.

    www.finalcall.com
     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That is the way of things brotherfarmers were always in that predicament since ancient times

    The thing is we must all do what ever we can and in every way we can to make sure that they contnue to make that much,
    and are able to keep their farms as the economy chrashes, and corporate farms

    seek a Grapes of Wrath scenario with Black farmers
     
  6. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Looking towards the future , a great project is to get ones Block association or in conjunction with another adjacent one to chip in and purchase that ole abandoned lot, and hook it up,
    but check with yopur trusted local black plitician or progressive, to make sure some corporate suckers won't try to pull an eminent domain on the garden in years to come.

    And always purchase HEIRLOOM SEED

    for those with no access to a windowsill or rooftop, please investigate hydroponics
     
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