Black People : 86 kanye-86 pepsi

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Therious, Sep 26, 2005.

  1. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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    86 KANYE 86 PEPSI Greetings!....

    Kanye West, former spokesperson for Pepsi, has since lost his
    endorsement deal with the soft drink giant due to his publicized remarks
    regarding the mishandling of the Katrina evacuees/victims.

    I mean if you're like me...just SICK and TIRED of being black in America
    and being mishandled, then do something. Our parents and their parent's
    SHUT DOWN an entire bus system during the Civil Rights era by CHOOSING
    to do something. Here is your opportunity.

    I'm calling a boycott on ALL Pepsi products. If they want to drop Kanye,
    how about we DROP them! And as much as I love a good Pepsi and a bag of
    Fritos, I'm not buying another Pepsi including any of their family
    products (see link below) until a formal apology is given and a donation
    is rendered to the Red Cross (or a similar organization) in the sum of
    the amount of Kanye's contract with Pepsi.

    OK YOU PEPSI DRINKERS . WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO SAY??????

    ----------------------
    If you're committed to doing something to tell not just Pepsi but the
    world (including the Associated Press for that racist caption) that
    there is power in the Black community, then pass this along. Because
    there's POWER in numbers.

    Sincerely,

    Shondell Towns- Boycott Organizer

    Pepsi Products:

    Pepsi/Frito Lay/Gatorade/Tropicana/Quaker Pepsi-Cola Caffeine Free Pepsi
    Diet Pepsi Caffeine Free Diet Pepsi Pepsi Twist (regular & diet) Wild
    Cherry Pepsi Pepsi Blue Pepsi ONE Pepsi Vanilla Diet Mountain Dew
    Mountain Dew Code Red Diet Mountain Dew Code Red Mountain Dew LiveWire
    Mountain Dew Blueshock Mountain Dew AMP energy drink Mug (Root Beer)
    Sierra Mist (Regular & Diet) Slice Lipton Brisk (Partnership) Lipton
    Iced Tea(Partnership) Dole juices and juice drinks (License) FruitWorks
    juice drinks Aquafina purified drinking water Frappuccino ready-to-drink
    coffee (Partnership) Starbucks DoubleShot (Partnership) SoBe juice
    drinks, dairy, and teas SoBe energy drinks (No Fear and Adrenaline Rush)

    See a list of products by clicking here:


    http://www.pepsico.com/PEP_Company/BrandsCompanies/index.cfm

    LET'S DO THIS FOLKS. Hit them where they can feel it.
     
  2. kente417mojo

    kente417mojo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I'm glad I don't drink that crap, but I'll tell people that I know about this. this right here should let us all know where we stand in this country.
     
  3. Khasm13

    Khasm13 STAFF STAFF

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    NO MORE GATERAIDE FOR ME....
    I AGREE....

    one love
    khasm
     
  4. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    http://eurweb.com/story.cfm?id=22571


    :heart:

    Destee
     
  5. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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  6. kente417mojo

    kente417mojo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I'm still glad I don't drink that stuff. Either way, you're winning by not supporting Pepsi.
     
  7. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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    I HAVE SEeN THE AD SINCE, STILL WAITING 4 MORE INFO.
     
  8. karmashines

    karmashines Banned MEMBER

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    That's true... soda makes you fat. :(
     
  9. Nita

    Nita Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    well,

    I'm a watergirl myself. When if I do have a soda it's always Sprite or 7up.
    I was ready to join in with the boycott but it seems his deal is still in effect but if it changes I'm in.
     
  10. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    WHY YOU CAN'T IGNORE KANYE WEST

    Aug. 29, 2005
    The first time Kanye West asked the folks at Roc-A-Fella records to let him rap, there was an uncomfortable silence. As a producer, West had churned out hits for Roc-A-Fella's intimidating trio of stars--Jay-Z, Cam'ron and Beanie Siegel--and earned praise for his great ear and tireless ethic. But in 2002 the idea that someone like West could be a successful rapper was faintly absurd. "Kanye wore a pink shirt with the collar sticking up and Gucci loafers," recalls Damon Dash, then Roc-A-Fella CEO. "It was obvious we were not from the same place or cut from the same cloth." Says Jay-Z: "We all grew up street guys who had to do whatever we had to do to get by. Then there's Kanye, who to my knowledge has never hustled a day in his life. I didn't see how it could work."

    Roc-A-Fella wasn't the only label to pass on Kanye (pronounced Kahn-yay; it means "the Only One" in Swahili) West. Executives at record companies large and small failed to reconcile West's appearance and demeanor with their expectations of what a rapper should be. They had no idea how to market him. "It was a strike against me that I didn't wear baggy jeans and jerseys and that I never hustled, never sold drugs," says West, 28, who grew up in suburban Chicago and often dresses as if he's anticipating an acceptance letter from Exeter. "But for me to have the opportunity to stand in front of a bunch of executives and present myself, I had to hustle in my own way. I can't tell you how frustrating it was that they didn't get that. No joke--I'd leave meetings crying all the time."

    When West finally got a deal (in the end, Roc-A-Fella overcame its institutional bias against Polo shirts), he shattered the myth that he was too soft, too weird and too bourgeois to fit the mold of a platinum-selling rapper. His 2004 debut album, The College Dropout, went nearly triple platinum, topped all the major critics' polls, earned 10 Grammy nominations and made rap accessible to audiences that hadn't paid attention in years. "That record restored my faith in hip-hop," says Jamie Foxx, who lent comic vocals to West's No. 1 hit Slow Jamz.

    West is hardly the first person to bring a Buppie sensibility to rap. In the '80s, DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince, A Tribe Called Quest and LL Cool J successfully wove suburban perspectives into rebellious music, but when gangsta rap arrived, nuance was smothered by a blanket of extreme poses. Tupac Shakur, once a student at the Baltimore School for the Arts, died with THUG LIFE tattooed across his torso. On The College Dropout, West found a way to bridge the divide without self-destruction. His follow-up, Late Registration, arrives Aug. 30 and continues to mix race and class with beats and melodies. It is widely expected to be the biggest-selling record of the year--1.6 million copies will be shipped to stores for its first week of release.

    The College Dropout was 76 minutes of someone cramming every thought he'd ever had about himself into rhyme. It was immaculately produced, but what made it compelling was the contradictions. The song Jesus Walks mixed spirituality with skepticism and rap with gospel. All Falls Down slammed the "single black female addicted to retail" but concluded with West admitting, "I wanna act ballerific, like it's all terrific/ I got a couple past due bills, I won't get specific/ I got a problem with spending before I get it/ We all self-conscious, I'm just the first to admit it." Throughout, West careered between the Protestant ethic and street fantasies, revealing himself to be wise and stupid, arrogant and insecure, often in the same breath. But by baring his flaws and being self-critical--and daring listeners to do the same--he created a fresh portrait of African-American middle-class angst, and you could dance to it.

    It didn't take long for The College Dropout to develop coattails. Fashion-wise, you may have been blinded recently by the swarm of pink Polo shirts, while on the charts, West's friends John Legend, an R&B singer with a University of Pennsylvania degree, and Common, a whip-smart and austere Chicago rapper, both had sales spikes. West's Late Registration should push things further. "I didn't want to play it boring and safe," says West while sitting in the balcony of a 14th century church in Prague, one of the locations he hand-picked for the video of Diamonds from Sierra Leone, the Shirley Bassey-- based first single from Late Registration. "I also didn't want to innovate too much. Second albums, man, they're even scarier than first ones."

    Musically, West took the extraordinary risk of fiddling with his sound by asking Jon Brion, known mostly for his collaborations with the talented but flaky Fiona Apple, to co-produce. Lyrically, he continues to stomp taboos and create a witty catalog of his schizophrenia. If that makes him sound like Eminem, it's worth noting that West is usually incorrigible like a puppy, not a pit bull. "His music is about being human," says West's obviously biased mother Donda, who recently retired from her post as chair of the English department at Chicago State University. "It's like Walt Whitman. 'Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself. I am large, I contain multitudes.'" West's old boss, Damon Dash, puts it a little differently: "He combines the superficialness that the urban demographic needs with conscious rhymes for the kids with backpacks. It's brilliant business."

    That the "urban demographic" needs "superficialness" could be read as two euphemisms away from racism. But Dash, an African American who thinks exclusively in shades of green, is merely letting the world in on what's accepted as social fact by much of the record industry. Hip-hop was born in the '70s as party music and evolved in the '80s into that rarest of pleasures--socially relevant party music. But in the mid-'90s, the genre came to be dominated by people like Snoop Dogg (sample track: Murder Was the Case), the Notorious B.I.G. (Ten Crack Commandments) and Jay-Z (Rap Game/ Crack Game)--excellent rappers with a shrewd eye for journalistic detail but, to put it bluntly, ex--drug dealers. "Rap changed a lot in the last few years," notes comedian and hip-hop fan Chris Rock, who says he listens to The College Dropout while he writes jokes. "In the early days, the best rappers weren't necessarily from the hood. Run-D.M.C. was from Hollis [Queens, N.Y.]. Eric B and Rakim were from Long Island. They lived next to the hood."

    When the hard stuff sold well (hard stuff, in any medium, always does), the record labels, never bastions of original thought, asked for more. Soon rappers who had never got a speeding ticket were referring to themselves as pimps and hustlas, and what had started as ghetto reporting with a touch of caricature metastasized into caricature with no tether to reality. The result was a torrent of albums about the joys of acquisitiveness (bling, if you must), consequence-free violence and compliant women.

    All that was complicated by--and you had to know it was coming--race. Statistics consistently show that 70% of hip-hop is consumed by young white audiences, but a century of anecdotal evidence is similarly irrefutable: white kids think it's cool to be black, which means the other 30% sets the trends and runs the show. With the market mired in thuggery, African-American consumers' could choose to: a) propagate a nasty stereotype of themselves for white kids to pin their libidinous fantasies on; b) not care; c) start patronizing the danger-free, supernice, superboring rappers at the liberal humanist fringe; or d) give up.

    "I stopped listening to hip-hop 10 years ago," says Darryl McDaniels, the D.M.C. in Run-D.M.C. McDaniels points out that Run-D.M.C. rhymed about everything from materialism (My Adidas) and higher education ("I'm D.M.C. in the place to be/ I go to St. John's University") to Santa Claus (Christmas in Hollis). "We weren't choirboys, but we had multiple points of view. This past decade it seems like hip-hop has mostly been about parties and guns and women. That's fine if you're in a club, but from 9 a.m. till I went to bed at night, the music had nothing to say to me. So I listened to classic rock." What brought McDaniels back from his diet of John Mellencamp and Bob Seger was Jesus Walks. "When I heard it, I just stopped in my tracks," says McDaniels. "I thought, 'This song is about everything! This feels alive!'"


    CLICK ON THE WEBSITE FOR THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE!

    http://www.time.com/time/archive/preview/0,10987,1096499,00.html

    PEACE!
    ISAIAH
     
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