Law Forum : 1960s black militant H. Rap Brown challenging imprisonment

Clyde C Coger Jr

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1960s black militant H. Rap Brown challenging imprisonment

The 75-year-old inmate, who converted to Islam and now goes by the name Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin, gained prominence more than 50 years ago as a Black Panthers leader who famously said, "Violence is as American as cherry pie."

https://news.yahoo.com/ex-black-militant-turned-muslim-cleric-says-rights-124653976.html

KATE BRUMBACK
Associated Press



FILE- In this March 11, 2002 file photo, Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin watches during the sentencing portion of his trial in Atlanta. Al-Amin, the militant civil rights leader known in the 1960s as H. Rap Brown who was convicted of killing Fulton County Sheriff's Deputy Ricky Kinchen and wounding Deputy Aldranon English in a shootout in March 2000, is challenging his imprisonment, saying his constitutional rights were violated at trial. (AP Photo/Ric Feld, File)

 

Fireman

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SOA Rap Brown was one of the black men that I really admired during the Civil Rights Movement. He was one of the first black men that I saw who wasn't afraid to speak his mind to America about racism and white people. I had an album of him. But things seemed to change for Rap Brown after the Civil Rights Movement. He robbed a bar and he just faded from the radar. Then he shot and killed a black deputy who was trying to serve him a warrant in Atlanta. I just think that years probably police surveillance and monitoring made him paranoid. His story is tragic.
 
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Symbol of America

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SOA Rap Brown was one of the black men that I really admired during the Civil Rights Movement. He was one of the first black men that I saw who wasn't afraid to speak his mind to our about racism and white people. I had an album of him. But things seemed to change for Rap Brown after the Civil Rights Movement. He robbed a bar and he just faded from the radar. Then he shot and killed a black deputy who was trying to serve him a warrant in Atlanta. I just think that years probably of police surveillance and monitoring made him paranoid. His story is tragic.
H Rap was an icon like Stokely. I believe the BPP considered Huey and Eldridge as the vanguard to set events in motion and H Rap and Stokely were the academics, leastways as I see it. Remember COINTELPRO was brought to life in 1956 so by the time the Civil Rights Movement hit the press and popped into the law enforcement radar in the tumultuous 60's the CIA was already aiding the DOJ with misinformation, disinformation and psychological warfare campaigns leading to confusion, isolation, distrust and paranoia in our more proactive leadership.
 

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