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Black Education / Schools : Where did all the black male teachers go?

Discussion in 'Black Education / Schools' started by MsInterpret, Sep 29, 2010.

  1. Mikha'el

    Mikha'el Active Member MEMBER

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    I get where ur going with this....indeed we should see more black teachers....my principal in HS was black...we'd like to see african americans be prominent in the education system...but the education field is one of the most underappericated fields today which i believe is part of the problem collectively

    But also to me it wouldnt matter...long as my instructor can teach im good...but it'd be nice to see afircans conqueror this area
  2. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    There is some truth to the argument that Black males are pursuing more lucrative professions other than teaching. I obtained my preliminary teaching credential in 1986 at I was the only Black student in my credential program at UCLA. Every 5 years since I had to take continuing education classes to renew my credential, or to obtain additional credentialing. I took master's degree courses at 2 universities, in addition to continuing education classes part-time (with leaves of absence in-between) between 1986-2005 and in all of my classes I was either the only Black student, or one of two. The means that I was not only the only Black person in most of my classses, but the only Black male as well. When I was taking special education classes at UCLA I was the only Black student in my program between 1986-1990.

    I do believe there was/is a purging of older, tenured Black teachers that is still in effect. Whenever I speak to some of my former colleagues who are still in the public system in Los Angeles unified they are always relating to me how this occurs.

    However, teachers have a stigma of being poor and most yong Black men I encounter express to me their plans to do something more lucrative.
  3. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I worked in the engineering field for 5 years before deciding to go back to graduate school and become an educator. I often heard the above statement and was ridiculed for choosing to leave what could have been a lucrative career as an electrical designer, but I felt a different calling.

    What I have found though is that while it is true that alot of teachers are those who had problems making it in other professions then resorted to teaching, I also know even more who did not last in the teaching profession for more than five years for various reasons. Chief among these were failure to obtain proper credentialing and/or poor training in classroom management.

    Teaching and managing a classroom of over 40 students is not an easy task. There are many who try and MOST fail.
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  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    ^^^^^ Well said.



    And also for consideration is the cultural clash between black males....With many of our youth being reared by single mothers, many young girls and males do and have had a problem with "male authority figures."
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  5. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Make that BLACK Male "authority figures".

    You might be surprised at just how many Black students, male and female PREFER white Male teachers.
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Well, I thought that the "BLACK" was tacitly understood. lol

    However, such a reception with the "White" male teachers was not my experience during my own classroom years.

    I have known black girls and black boys to be quite recalcitrant and down-right belligerent with a White male teacher and a Black or White FEMALE teacher could come along and calm the student down.

    I'd seen it and experienced this myself.

    The little girls would be rolling eyes and "neck-workin" and the boys would be 'bout ready to throw some 'bows.
  7. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Well that speaks to difference in experience and demographics. Even my present experience where I work now the most popular teacher is a white, jewish male.

    The following "testimony" will might cause some uproar but this is just one, white male's perspective.

    I find that much of what he say, ironically, is ture, even though possibly exaggerated.

    http://martynemko.blogspot.com/2009/06/white-teacher-speaks-out-what-is-it.html
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That's true.....Black and Mexican students respond differently according to their respective cultures......something that many White teachers, male and female do not comprehend/grasp.

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