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DEACONS FOR DEFENSE AND JUSTICE...

Discussion in 'Honoring Black Ancestors' started by Isaiah, Sep 27, 2004.

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  1. RTucker

    RTucker New Member MEMBER

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    No Jail, No Arrest Day - July 15, 2005

    Maybe its time we protect our young men and women.

    Have you heard about No Jail, No Arrest Day?

    July 15, 2005

    No Jail - No Arrest Day

    The goal is to have no one in Black Communities throughout the country arrested or jailed on this day. There is a multi-billion dollar industry that depends in large part on the arrest and incarceration of blacks in this country. Since we can't fight the system we can just stop going to jail. Our success on July 15th will be a beginning.

    No drugs or illegal weapons in the house, the car, or on your person. No Arrests!!!

    No anger to the point of violence. No Arrests!!!

    No disorderly conduct. No Arrests!!!

    No traffic violations. No Arrests!!!

    No excessive drinking. No Arrests!!!

    No abuse of spouses, children, or parents. No Arrests!!!

    Share the word from Seattle to Miami and from Portland, Maine to San Diego.

    July 15, 2005 No Arrest - No Jail Day

    Copy this and make a flier. Send an email. Post it on an internet bulletin board. Get the word out.
  2. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    By Any Means Necessary
    by MIKE MARQUSEE

    The Deacons for Defense: Armed Resistance and the Civil Rights Movement
    by Lance Hill


    [from the July 5, 2004 issue]

    In June 1965 James Farmer, leader of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and longtime champion of Gandhian nonviolence, arrived in Bogalusa, Louisiana, to support a desegregation struggle in the heart of "Klan nation." Farmer had been escorted from New Orleans airport by a group of armed black men, who also stationed themselves in the hall where he spoke and watched discreetly over the march he led the next day through the town center. Pressed by reporters on his organization's links with the men with guns--members of the Deacons for Defense and Justice--Farmer was coy. "Even in the church you have your sinners: we feel we can demonstrate to these people with our philosophy of love and nonviolence that there is another way."

    To many, it seemed a hopeless attempt to reconcile the irreconcilable, but in retrospect the scene exemplifies the tensions and contradictions that infused the African-American freedom struggle on the eve of the Watts riot. The initial advances of the civil rights movement had been met with a brutal wave of white terrorism. In the states of the Deep South, the federal government seemed unwilling to enforce either the new Civil Rights Act or the Constitution. It was in response to the growing sense of crisis and impotence that the Deacons emerged in mid-1964 in the pine hills of northern Louisiana. Offering a blend of armed self-defense, grassroots organizing and black pride, they rapidly attained legendary status in besieged black communities and attracted sensationalist coverage in the white media. Their meteoric career--by 1968 they had vanished from the scene--spanned a watershed in the movement's history, when, according to some versions, the idealism and unity of the nonviolent phase gave way to extremism, bitterness and factionalism.

    That schema has always been a tendentious political construct, and the remarkable tale of the Deacons for Defense illustrates just how artificial it is. Lance Hill's book is the first full account of the group and fills a major lacuna in the history of the era and the movement. It is also a welcome corrective to the school of civil rights historians who try to fix this multipronged, protean movement into the static polarities of nonviolence and violence, liberal integrationism and radical separatism.


    FOR MORE, CLICK ON THE WEBSITE BELOW...

    http://www.thenation.com/docprint.mhtml?i=20040705&s=marqusee


    PEACE!
    ISAIAH
  3. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    "******* AINT GONNA RUN THIS TOWN..."

    "******* Ain’t Gonna Run This Town":
    Militancy, Conflict and the Sustenance of the Hegemony in Bogalusa, Louisiana

    by Seth Hague

    This paper was selected by the Department of History as the Outstanding Paper for the 1997-1998 academic year.

    The battle for civil rights in Bogalusa, Louisiana was a struggle for power, but it was different from the prototypical struggles in the agricultural South during the 1960s. Industrialization is the main reason for this difference, as the black laborers met challenges distinctly different than the problems associated with the struggle in the agricultural South. Oppressed rural black populations were much more inclined to follow the leadership from groups like CORE and SNCC, whereas the laboring class of blacks in industrialized towns such as Jonesboro and Bogalusa fought themselves for power and demanded that outside coalitions like CORE follow them. They exercised militancy, embedded in them as the result of the rigid class-consciousness imposed by an oppositional white power structure, through an armed self-defense organization they created known as the Deacons for Defense and Justice. The efforts already made by the Jonesboro black laborers, entrenched in a similar situation in another industrialized Louisiana mill town, further inspired militancy in Bogalusa. Once Crown-Zellerbach laborers A.Z. Young and Robert Hicks assumed leadership of the (all-black) Bogalusa Civic and Voters’ League, the community came to embrace the militant rhetoric of the Jonesboro Deacons. Many violent conflicts ensued under this ideology and culminated in a climactic summer in 1965. Consequently, the black workers’ militancy threatened not only the power of the middle class blacks, but also the political and economic hegemony of the white power structure in Bogalusa. Except for a few noteworthy courtroom "victories" versus Crown-Zellerbach, threatening the power structure was virtually the struggle’s only effect as the white power structure subsumed the militancy and rhetoric of the revolutionary Bogalusans.

    The Deacons for Defense and Justice arrived in Bogalusa under extremely turbulent conditions. On February 21 Frederick Douglas Kirkpatrick, Ernest Thomas, and CORE worker Charles Fenton set out from Jonesboro to Bogalusa. The trek was over three hundred miles through rough Klan country. When the group reached Baton Rouge that night, they heard a news update on the radio announcing that Malcolm X had been assassinated. Ominously, Malcolm was in Selma, Alabama less than three weeks prior to his assassination, predicting that the campaign for racial equality may be forced to abandon its non-violent image. The carload of militants from Bogalusa attested the accuracy of that prophesy.


    CLICK ON THE WEBSITE TO READ THE ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY...

    http://www.loyno.edu/~history/journal/1997-8/Hague.html


    PEACE!
    ISAIAH

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